2022 Edition

Child and Family Development and Support Services (CA-CFD) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of families. 

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.

Currently viewing: CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT AND SUPPORT SERVICES (CA-CFD)

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Purpose

  Child and Family Development and Support Services promote positive parenting; support children's health and safety; strengthen parent-child relationships; improve family functioning and self-sufficiency; and enhance parental health, well-being, and life course development.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, program model, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker, when applicable
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CA-CFD 2.01

Direct service personnel are qualified by:

  1. a bachelor’s degree in a health or human service field; 
  2. a high school degree or equivalent and at least two years’ experience working with children and families; or
  3. certification in accordance with an evidence-based program model.

 

CA-CFD 2.02

Supervisors are qualified by:

  1. an advanced degree in a relevant health or human service field;
  2. a bachelor’s degree in a relevant human service field and at least two years’ experience working with children and families; or
  3. a two-year diploma in a relevant human services field and at least four years’ experience working with children and families.
Examples: When supervisors are qualified by element (b), prior experience with supervision may also be desirable. 

 

CA-CFD 2.03

All direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:

  1. establishing professional boundaries and employing appropriate methods of support;
  2. encouraging independence;
  3. understanding child development and individual and family functioning;
  4. identifying and building on strengths and protective factors;
  5. assessing needs, risks, and safety;
  6. helping family members develop skills relevant to positive parenting, child development, caregiving, health and safety, and/or positive personal development, as appropriate to the services provided;
  7. understanding, recognizing, and responding to problems related to child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, substance use, and mental health, including signs of prenatal and postpartum depression; and
  8. implementing the specific program model used to deliver services, if applicable.
NA The organization provides only parent education groups.

 

CA-CFD 2.04

All direct service personnel providing early intervention services are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. administering early intervention techniques;
  2. understanding issues of particular relevance to the families of children with developmental delays or disabilities; and
  3. helping families learn how to support and promote their children’s healthy development.
NA The organization does not provide early intervention services.

 

CA-CFD 2.05

All direct service personnel providing parent education services in a group setting are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:

  1. providing a supportive, nonjudgmental environment that promotes respectful interactions;
  2. engaging and motivating group members;
  3. understanding group dynamics;
  4. leading discussions;
  5. facilitating group activities;
  6. helping family members develop skills relevant to the class's areas of focus, including positive parenting, child development, caregiving, health and safety, and/or positive personal development, as appropriate to the services provided; and
  7. implementing the specific program model used to deliver services, if applicable.
NA The organization does not provide parent education groups.

 

CA-CFD 2.06

The organization maintains service continuity by:
  1. assigning a worker at intake or early in the contact;
  2. avoiding the arbitrary or indiscriminate reassignment of direct service personnel; and
  3. using a team approach to ensure a comprehensive and integrated approach to service delivery, when multiple providers are involved.

 

CA-CFD 2.07

Employee workloads support the achievement of child and family outcomes and are regularly reviewed. 

Interpretation

When an organization implements a specific evidence-based program model, caseloads/workloads should be based on the model guidelines and reflected in policy/procedures and practice.

Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:

  1. the program model being implemented;
  2. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
  3. whether services are provided by multiple professionals or team members;
  4. case complexity and circumstances, including the intensity of child and family needs, the frequency of services provided, the size of the family, travel time, and the goal of the case; 
  5. case status, including progress toward achievement of desired outcomes;
  6. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  7. service volume.