2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services Definition

Purpose

Employee Assistance Programs help organizations achieve business health and productivity goals, and support individuals working to maintain or improve their productivity, functioning, and pro-social behaviour, as well as remain at or return to the workplace.

Definition

Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) are employer sponsored workplace-related services provided internally or under a contract or arrangement with an employer, union, or organization designed to address the individual and work-related issues that interfere with a healthy and productive workplace; and support the organization in meeting its productivity goals. EAP services generally include information and referral; assessment and referral; employee education on personal, psychosocial and workplace performance issues; consultation and training for supervisors, managers, and human resource and union representatives; critical incident training and response services; and follow-up.

Note:Depending on the services an EAP provides, the organization may be required to complete one or more additional service sections, such as: Counselling, Support, and Education Services (CA-CSE); Case Management (CA-CM); Mental Health and/or Substance Use Services (CA-MHSU); or Crisis Response and Information Services (CA-CRI).


Note:While many organizations have EAP services as a staff benefit, the EAP standards outlined in this section are intended only for organizations that directly provide EAP services.


Note: Please see CA-EAP Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.


Note:For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the EAP Crosswalk.


2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 1: Person-Centered Logic Model

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies:
  1. needs the program will address;
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs);
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results;
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered); 
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in service recipients); and
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system.
Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models.

Examples: Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 
  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; 
  2. risks assessments conducted for specific interventions; and
  3. the best available evidence of service effectiveness.
Examples: Common EAP outcomes include, for example, personal and/or workplace productivity and healthy workplace relationships.
NotePlease see the Logic Model Template for additional guidance on this standard.  
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one client outcome has been identified for all of its programs; or
  • All but a few staff have been trained on use of therapeutic interventions and training is scheduled for the rest; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs; or
  • Several staff have not been trained on the use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of therapeutic interventions, as required; or
  • There is no process for identifying risks associated with use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs; or
  • There is no written policy or procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions; or 
  • Procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation on therapeutic interventions is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • There is evidence that clients have been harmed by inappropriate or unmonitored use of therapeutic interventions.
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • See program description completed during intake
  • Program logic model that includes a list of outcomes being measured
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of individuals served and customer organizations.
Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.

Interpretation: EAP providers must be appropriately licensed in the province where the service is being received, or as required by legal, regulatory, and/or contractual requirements.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CA-EAP 2.01

Assessment and referral, and short-term counselling personnel are qualified by:
  1. an advanced degree in a human service field;
  2. appropriate licensure, certification, or registration;
  3. training and experience in substance use treatment; and
  4. EAP related experience.
Interpretation: This applies to services provided through all means, including face-to-face, telephone, Internet-based online services, and other electronic communication tools (i.e., smart-phone applications).

Interpretation: When organizations utilize interns, individuals working towards licensure, or are unable to recruit individuals with an advanced degree, they should receive appropriate training and ensure that supervision is provided by a professional with an advanced degree.
Examples: Examples of related experience can include in-house EAP training; training and experience in organizational dynamics; CEAP designation; at least 2,500 hours post-master’s degree clinical experience; or two years of EAP experience in a management, consultant, and/or direct service role.

 

CA-EAP 2.02

Information and referral, and intake personnel are qualified by: 
  1. an associate's degree in a human services profession; and 
  2. at least one year of clinical practicum in social work, psychology, mental health, or another human services profession.

 

CA-EAP 2.03

The EAP senior manager or equivalent is qualified by:
  1. an advanced degree in a field related to EAP services;
  2. appropriate state licensure, certification, or registration;
  3. at least two years of post-graduate experience; and
  4. competence in administering and providing EAP services.

 

CA-EAP 2.04

EAP counselling professionals complete annual requirements for state professional development hours (PDHs), continuing education units (CEU), or the equivalent.
Interpretation: Such requirements should be completed at accredited colleges/universities, other licensed institutions, or through EASNA, EAPA, or CEAP-sponsored courses.

 

CA-EAP 2.05

Counsellors are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. EAP core technology and optional EAP services;
  2. EAP theory and practise;
  3. the application of counselling skills in a workplace setting;
  4. crisis intervention preparedness;
  5. short-term counselling models;
  6. use of health care insurance benefits;
  7. critical incident response services and/or psychological first aid;
  8. mental health and substance use conditions;
  9. work performance assessments;
  10. applicable information on privacy and security regulations; and
  11. organizational development and human resource management.

 

CA-EAP 2.06

Non-clinical personnel, such as account managers, are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. EAP products and services;
  2. essential components of EAPs;
  3. wellness services, as applicable;
  4. risk prevention and crisis response;
  5. outreach; and
  6. consultation and training for managers, supervisors and union representatives.

 

CA-EAP 2.07

Personnel have access to a supervisor or other professional to provide back-up and support in managing cases that involve threats of violence, including homicidal and suicidal ideation.

 

CA-EAP 2.08

Personnel workloads support the achievement of client outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining personnel workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of persons served.

 

CA-EAP 2.09

The EAP has a system to analyze its capacity to meet the demand for services that addresses: 
  1. providing services in relation to risk level and urgency; and
  2. ability to manage the needs of its network.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 3: Access to Service

Eligible participants and client organizations receive EAP services promptly and responsively.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Access procedures
  • Procedures for addressing life-threatening emergency situations
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Clients
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 3.01

The EAP communicates to customers, individuals, and eligible participants that access to services occurs through:
  1. self-referral by individuals and eligible participants;
  2. suggestions or referrals by supervisors, union representatives, human resources, and/or medical personnel;
  3. formal referrals; and
  4. mandatory referrals.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EAP 3.02

Client or host/customer organization problems that occur during and outside of work hours are addressed as follows:
  1. life-threatening emergency situations are addressed immediately, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year;
  2. non-life threatening emergencies are addressed by the end of the next business day; and
  3. counsellors with clinical backgrounds are available by telephone to respond to emergencies and able to access appropriate resources either directly or by referral.

 

CA-EAP 3.03

The EAP adjusts its staffing patterns and availability to accommodate the working hours of individuals at the host or customer organization, and counsellors:
  1. are available within a reasonable proximity of client homes, work sites, and/or public transportation, unless the geography of the area prohibits such availability;
  2. offer appointments outside of normal business hours, such as at least one evening a week or on weekends; and
  3. provide clear directions to the counselling site.

 

CA-EAP 3.04

EAP direct service staff has access to a description of services, as stipulated under the terms of each contract, that is provided to clients and eligible participants.

 

CA-EAP 3.05

The EAP offers access to services, educational resources, and manager/leadership information through a variety of channels.
Examples: For example, services may be provided via:  
  1. in-person meetings at a private office located at the company;
  2. in-person meetings at a private office located off-site at an EAP counsellor's office; 
  3. telephone;
  4. a website for information and education;
  5. e-mail exchange for services;
  6. video and audio live exchange for services; and
  7. smart-phone based technology for texting, chat, or other communication tools.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 4: Internal EAP/Parent Company Relations

The internal EAP and its parent company establish in writing:
  1. the services to be provided;
  2. budgetary and staffing resources;
  3. how confidentiality is maintained;
  4. the legal relationship between the EAP and its parent company;
  5. roles and responsibilities of other affiliated departments at the organization, such as work-life or wellness; and
  6. clear lines of responsibility for the EAP and all EAP activities.
Interpretation: This standard does not apply to EAP providers that are contracted to provide services on-site.
NA The organization is an external EAP only.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • EAP/Parent Company agreement
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Parent company President/CEO or his/her designee
    2. Program director
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 5: Program Implementation and Contract Management

The organization’s needs and contractual obligations determine the EAP services provided and the content of service utilization reports.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Implementation plan(s)
  • Contract(s) with the organization
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Parent company President/CEO or his/her designee
    2. Program director

 

CA-EAP 5.01

The EAP develops an implementation plan based on information gathered in collaboration with the organization to facilitate program design that identifies:
  1. tasks and responsibilities for the EAP and the organization; and 
  2. the timeline for completion.
Examples: Examples of information that may be gathered to develop an implementation plan include, as applicable:
  1. a confidential survey of individual and management representatives to identify key problem areas;
  2. employee profiles and demographics;
  3. employee absenteeism rates;
  4. employee turnover rates;
  5. accidental injuries;
  6. health insurance costs;
  7. worker’s compensation claims;
  8. previous EAP utilization information; 
  9. transition planning for continuity of care for existing high risk cases and those requiring ongoing case management;
  10. regulatory and legislative requirements applicable to the customer organization;
  11. history of disability insurance claims for mental health and/or addictions; and
  12. descriptions and utilization figures for other relevant workplace programs at the customer organization, such as work-life, wellness, occupational medicine, and disease management programs, as applicable.

 

CA-EAP 5.02

The implementation plan includes mechanisms for promotional and employee communications.
Examples: Examples of communications include, but are not limited to, the following:
  1. printed communications;
  2. company website;
  3. referral resource database;
  4. listservs, discussion groups, chat rooms, instant messenger, and other electronic communication tools;
  5. training of supervisors, key management, and union representatives;
  6. employee orientation;
  7. coordinating branding for integration of EAP with other relevant programs such as work/life and wellness (e.g., to address the use of a combined or common web portal for multiple programs); and
  8. other promotional and educational activities.

 

CA-EAP 5.03

Prior to initiating a contract, and at renewal, the EAP and host or customer organization address the following operational practices and definitions for reporting practices:
  1. how a case for individual services is defined (i.e., criteria for case open and case closed);
  2. how a “new” client is defined (i.e., a client is a person who can potentially have multiple case episodes of services);
  3. the amount (for example, number of hours) of clinical and account management time projected per defined period;
  4. the outcomes and metrics to be used in evaluating EAP service delivery;
  5. the evidence required to assess if service performance standards are being met;
  6. the methodology used to measure service user satisfaction and outcomes; 
  7. the measurement process for assessing outcomes for cases after using the service (i.e., level of satisfaction with the service; level of overall improvement, level of change in work performance/productivity; level of work performance in absenteeism); 
  8. how the utilization of individual services are counted and calculated (for use of services provided by the counsellors);
  9. how the utilization of other non-clinical individual services are counted and calculated (for use of services provided by the EAP for financial assistance, legal assistance, work-life services, etc.);
  10. how the utilization of management consultation and other organizational level services are counted and calculated (i.e., counsellor meetings with supervisors alone and with groups of supervisors and workers, on-site support after a traumatic event or crisis, support for organizational changes, etc.); 
  11. how the utilization of training and educational services lead by EAP staff are counted and calculated (i.e., for onsite trainings on specific topics, lunch and learn sessions, health fairs, etc.);
  12. how the utilization of Internet and website EAP services are counted and calculated (i.e., for general information, for educational resources, webinars, affiliate counsellor search tools, educational resources downloaded, assessment tools completed, etc.); and
  13. the format and frequency of reports.
Interpretation: The standard requires the EAP to designate the numerator and denominator for purposes of utilization as addressed in each of the utilization rates provided by the company (h, i, j, k, and l from above). For example: The Counsellor Case Rate for h (see above) is calculated by dividing the total number of counsellor cases (including both employees and family/dependents) by the population count of the total number of covered employees and then multiplying this figure by 100. Training to supervisors and other units are not acceptable factors to be addressed in utilization.

 

CA-EAP 5.04

The EAP abides by formal contractual agreements and stipulates in writing:
  1. a designated account manager;
  2. objectives for the contract;
  3. services to be provided and by whom;
  4. financial terms;
  5. facility, equipment, and staff resources required;
  6. projected utilization rates;
  7. mutual indemnification, when appropriate; and
  8. roles and responsibilities of the EAP and customer organization.
NA The organization is an internal EAP only.

 

CA-EAP 5.05

The EAP and customer organization determine the components of data reporting.
Examples: For example, the EAP may provide information such as:
  1. the number of new cases opened;
  2. types of services requested;
  3. number of sessions provided for counselling services;
  4. number of educational trainings or associated participants;
  5. website usage;
  6. the number of client and/or supervisory consultations;
  7. the number of management consultations;
  8. the number of other services to the organization (e.g., crisis response events); 
  9. the number of other administrative activities; 
  10. the standardized level of utilization for individual cases who received counselling from the EAP;
  11. the standardized level of utilization for non-clinical services from the EAP;
  12. the standardized level of utilization for management consultations and other organizational services;
  13. the standardized level of utilization for trainings and other educational services;
  14. the standardized level of utilization for the Internet and web-related services; and
  15. other utilization trends, observations, and recommendations identified.

 

CA-EAP 5.06

The EAP maintains up-to-date information on each host or customer organization’s demographics, business, and covered EAP benefits.
Examples: Examples of information maintained may include, but are not limited to, employee locations; available health coverage, including mental health benefits; products or services provided by the customer organization; and whether it is a unionized or non-unionized setting.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 6: Contractor Accountability

The EAP implements a mechanism to ensure that affiliates and subcontractors comply with EAP policies and procedures.
Interpretation: The EAP will need to demonstrate implementation of standards that address services provided by subcontractors. Implementation can be demonstrated via the contract that outlines elements of standards, and a mechanism to monitor quality. Subcontracting organizations are not required to be accredited, but as noted in the interpretation to CA-EAP 6.04, implementation of the standards can support quality improvement.
NA The EAP does not use affiliates or subcontractors.
Note: Organizations must also implement the standards in CA-RPM 6 and CA-RPM 7 when they contract with subcontracting organizations.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Sample affiliate agreement
  • Procedures for conducting random quality improvement reviews of affiliates and subcontractors
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Affiliates
  • Review affiliate client records

 

CA-EAP 6.01

Affiliate agreements address:
  1. compliance with all applicable laws, including health, safety, and accessibility laws;
  2. record maintenance;
  3. transfer of confidential information;
  4. hours of operation;
  5. CEU, PDH, and other professional training requirements, including training on the EAP's policies, procedures, and service delivery model;
  6. standards for physical facilities, including comfort and privacy provisions; and
  7. use of standard data collection and client information forms.
Interpretation: Record maintenance should address:
  1. ownership of records;
  2. information that must be recorded in client records;
  3. organization access to client records for internal and external quality oversight, including review by external funders or regulators, and accrediting bodies;
  4. secure storage;
  5. destruction of records; and
  6. whether copies of records may be retained by the contractor.
NA The EAP does not use affiliates.

 

CA-EAP 6.02

Agreements with affiliates require them to carry professional liability insurance in the amount of $1 million/$3 million, or as required by applicable law.
NA The EAP does not use affiliates.

 

CA-EAP 6.03

The EAP routinely conducts random quality improvement reviews of a representative sample of affiliates used in the past year to assess:
  1. appropriateness of protocol and procedures;
  2. compliance with EAP contract requirements;
  3. attainment of the requisite credentials required of affiliates providing services, including assessment and referral, information and referral, and short-term counselling; and
  4. possession of current licensure, certification, or registration.
Interpretation: The EAP should determine an appropriate sampling methodology based on the volume of work affiliates produce (e.g., 10% of cases per year). Reviews can be conducted on-site or off-site through another quality improvement mechanism.
NA The EAP does not use affiliates.

 

CA-EAP 6.04

The EAP routinely conducts random quality improvement reviews of subcontractors to assess, as appropriate:
  1. appropriateness of service delivery procedures;
  2. safety of physical facilities;
  3. possession of current licensure; and
  4. compliance with EAP contract requirements.
Interpretation: Reviews can be conducted on-site or off-site through another quality improvement mechanism.
NA The EAP does not use subcontractors.
Examples: Examples of subcontracted services include, but are not limited to, legal services, work-life services, and financial services.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 7: Record-Keeping

Records are maintained in accordance with the EAP’s policy.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Record-keeping policy
  • Record-keeping procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 7.01

A separate and distinct EAP record is maintained for each client that is never part of or stored with any other client related record.
Examples: Other client related records may include managed care, personnel, medical records, or records of other services provided that are outside of the EAP's scope.

 

CA-EAP 7.02

EAP record-keeping practices are based upon an established definition of “client” and address the following:
  1. when a new client record is to be created;
  2. separation of client record contents when services are provided to individuals, couples, minors, and families; and
  3. disclosure protocols when the client record includes services provided to individuals, couples, minors, and families.

 

CA-EAP 7.03

EAP policy establishes ownership of client records.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 8: Assessment and Action Planning

Each client participates in the development of an assessment-based action plan that is the basis for delivery of appropriate services and support.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • In a few rare instances, urgent needs were not prioritized; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Culturally responsive assessments are the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Urgent needs are often not prioritized; or 
  • Services are frequently not initiated in a timely manner; or
  • Applicants are not receiving referrals, as appropriate; or 
  • Assessment and reassessment timeframes are often missed; or
  • Assessment are sometimes not sufficiently individualized; 
  • Culturally responsive assessments are not the norm, and this is not being addressed in supervision or training; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent; or
  • Intake or assessment is done by another organization or referral source and no documentation and/or summary of required information is present in case record. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • There are no written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
  • Action planning procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Clients
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 8.01

EAP counsellors/consultants obtain relevant assessment information including, as appropriate to the service provided:
  1. demographic information;
  2. the nature of the request or presenting problem;
  3. any workplace related issues;
  4. any immediate safety risks to self or others;
  5. environment and home situation;
  6. financial status and health insurance;
  7. social and peer group support;
  8. interests, skills, and aptitudes;
  9. work history and military service;
  10. medical history;
  11. physical illness/somatic variables/medical treatment;
  12. the use of alcohol or other drugs;
  13. depression screening;
  14. ongoing safety concerns;
  15. behavioural/cognitive patterns that cause health risks, based on physical, emotional, behavioural, or social conditions; and
  16. legal, vocational, and/or wellness needs of the client.
Examples: Workplace related issues can include, for example, co-worker conflicts, conflicts with managers, drug policy violations, manager consultations, performance improvement issues, and critical incidents.

 

CA-EAP 8.02

At the initial counselling session, the counsellor and the client:
  1. assess the underlying problem;
  2. discuss available options;
  3. address how the EAP can support the achievement of desired outcomes; and
  4. determine whether to retain the case for short-term counselling or to refer to an outside provider for ongoing treatment.
NA The EAP does not provide clinical services.

 

CA-EAP 8.03

An assessment-based action plan is developed in a timely manner with the full participation of the client and includes agreed upon goals, desired outcomes, and timeframes for achieving them.
Interpretation: Some clients that receive only short-term services may not implement a full planning process whereas others with more severe clinical issues, such as high-risk cases with depression or an addiction, likely will need a plan for continued support and monitoring of treatment delivery and improvement/relapse over time. Depending on the severity of the clinical issue and the corresponding action plan, expectations for short- and long-term follow-up between the client and EAP staff may be required.

Interpretation: Action planning is often done within the first or second session, after the initial assessment is completed, safety risks are resolved, and potential resources for support and treatment have been identified to meet the personal and financial needs of the client.

 

CA-EAP 8.04

The EAP establishes a system for review of cases and case consultation.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 9: Service Elements

The EAP partners with the host or customer organization to identify the needs of organizations and eligible participants, and provide services matched to client and organization goals.

Currently viewing: SERVICE ELEMENTS

VIEW THE STANDARDS

1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Procedures for referring individuals to services
  • Follow-up procedures
  • Procedures for critical incident planning
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Resource and referral list
  • Promotional materials and/or educational newsletters or articles
  • Training curricula
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Clients
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 9.01

The EAP service is designed to:
  1. help organizations develop and maintain a healthy and productive workplace for their employees;
  2. help individuals address the personal and work-related issues that interfere with being present and productive at work;
  3. help employees and clients with relationship, family, addiction, legal, financial, emotional, stress, work-life balance, and other personal problems;
  4. make referrals to appropriate services as needed; and
  5. provide preventive strategies to stimulate individual awareness and education and encourage early intervention.
Examples: The term “addiction” can address alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual, internet, and other chemical and behavioural addictions or addictive behaviours.

 

CA-EAP 9.02

The EAP has the capability to provide the following core EAP services to the organization and individuals:
  1. information and referral to support services;
  2. assessment and referral;
  3. employee education on personal, psychosocial, and workplace performance issues;
  4. training on the EAP for supervisors, managers, and human resource and union representatives;
  5. critical incident advance planning and training, and post-incident response services;
  6. development of referral options for needed services not provided under the contract or not available at the EAP; and
  7. capability for follow-up with more severe cases as appropriate.

 

CA-EAP 9.03

The EAP maintains up-to-date information for services available in the community and demonstrates a rapid and effective response in linking clients with appropriate EAP resources and supportive interventions.

 

CA-EAP 9.04

The EAP makes a referral when:
  1. it cannot promptly provide services;
  2. the client requires services beyond the stated or contractual mandate of the EAP; or
  3. specialized resources are not available through the EAP.
Examples: For example, in the case of a short-term counselling model, it may be appropriate to refer the client for alcohol or drug rehabilitation or psychiatric care.

 

CA-EAP 9.05

When making referrals, the EAP informs clients that they will be responsible for the cost of services beyond those provided by the EAP, and/or of any liabilities that may be incurred.

 

CA-EAP 9.06

The EAP emphasizes the importance of prevention in its activities and offers client organizations:
  1. promotional materials or educational newsletters or articles; and
  2. at least one relevant prevention activity quarterly based on the needs and feedback of the host or customer organization and its employees.

 

CA-EAP 9.07

The EAP, at the discretion of the host or customer organization, offers training which includes, but is not limited to:
  1. the philosophy of the EAP;
  2. confidentiality procedures and protections;
  3. the range of services provided;
  4. contact and accessibility information; and
  5. roles and responsibilities of management, supervisors, and union representatives, as applicable.

 

CA-EAP 9.08

The EAP offers appropriate education to individuals and management at the client organization on the following, as appropriate:
  1. crisis intervention;
  2. managing change;
  3. workplace violence prevention and response;
  4. tobacco, alcohol, and other drug related issues;
  5. availability and appropriate use of benefits and services; and
  6. supporting employees’ reintegration into the workplace when they return to work from disability claims for mental health disorders, addiction, and other cases with behavioural health comorbidities.

 

CA-EAP 9.09

The EAP has the capability to provide training for supervisors and union representatives on:
  1. the use of the EAP as a management tool;
  2. how to recognize signs of deteriorating job performance and the proper means of documenting this in the personnel record; and
  3. how to make referrals to the EAP for individual job performance and behavioural problems.

 

CA-EAP 9.10

The EAP arranges for follow-up contacts to determine if the individual:
  1. is adhering to the action plan;
  2. is improving work performance; and
  3. needs a referral for additional services.
NA The EAP does not provide high risk case management services.
Examples: Follow-up may occur for a variety of reasons depending on the nature of the case. Reasons can include, but are not limited to, contractual mandates, clinical necessity, assisting the person in obtaining the requested services or materials, and/or determining client satisfaction with services.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 10: Work-Life Services

Work-life services help employees integrate and achieve balance with work and family roles and demands, and create a more effective, healthy, and productive workplace.
NA The organization does not provide work-life services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Work-life information and materials
  • Resource and referral list
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Clients
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 10.01

The EAP assesses the current work-life situation of individuals and customer organizations to develop a coordinated, integrated accessible work-life portfolio.

 

CA-EAP 10.02

Work-life services are provided based on the assessed needs of the individuals and customer organization and can include any combination of:
  1. health and wellness promotion;
  2. childcare and parenting resources and referrals;
  3. eldercare resources and referrals;
  4. consultation and referrals on life events;
  5. assistance with policy and program development related to workplace flexibility;
  6. consultation regarding financial support for work-life related resources and services;
  7. community support and involvement opportunities; and
  8. cultural change initiatives.
Examples: Examples of life events for which consultation may be provided include education, adoption, parenting, financial or legal issues. Health and wellness promotion can focus on activities such as access to health reimbursement accounts, on-site health assessments, and health coaching on topics including chronic disease, stress management, and physical fitness. Workplace flexibility policies may address, for example, paid and unpaid time off, phased return from leave, job sharing, flexible time, and telecommuting, and programs related to on-site childcare, back-up childcare, and elder care support and resources.

 

CA-EAP 10.03

Work-life materials and information provided on the EAP’s website are up-to-date and accurate.
Examples: Examples of information to be maintained include contact information; type of service offered; licensure information; and location.
2023 Edition

Employee Assistance Program Services (CA-EAP) 11: Case Closing

Case closing is a planned, orderly, client-centered process.
Interpretation: The EAP should clearly define a "case", including what constitutes a new case, a closed case, and a re-opened case, and should be able to articulate how case closure impacts service utilization reports. Established protocols and mechanisms for determining when a case is closed will be based on the EAP’s unique business practices, service model, and/or contractual obligations.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,   
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, the organization terminated services inappropriately; or  
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent; or
  • A formal case closing evaluation is not consistently provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Services are frequently terminated inappropriately; or  
  • Aftercare planning is not initiated early enough to ensure orderly transitions; or
  • A formal case closing summary and assessment is seldom provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard; or  
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing. 
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Case closing procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Clients
  • Review client records

 

CA-EAP 11.01

Case closing is a clearly defined process that actively involves the client, as appropriate.
Interpretation: Some clients may only receive 1-2 counselling sessions and thus case closing activities may be minimal in order to meet the client's need for brief support and interest in continuing to receive services.

 

CA-EAP 11.02

Case closure is based upon the following: 
  1. clinically appropriate EAP services, for which the client is eligible, have been made available to and/or used by the client;
  2. follow-up has been offered and/or completed; and
  3. clinically appropriate treatment aftercare recommendations have been provided, as appropriate.
Interpretation: The EAP counsellor should follow-up with the client to determine whether post-EAP services were received.
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