CA-YIL Standard. Generated 12/04/2022. ©2022 Council on Accreditation.
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services Definition

Purpose

Young adults who receive Youth Independent Living Services obtain safe and stable housing, develop life skills and competencies including work readiness, achieve educational and financial growth goals, and establish healthy, supportive adult and peer relationships.

Definition

Youth Independent Living Services are designed for older adolescents who have been separated from their homes, may have been disconnected from long-term family relationships, and may have assumed parenting responsibilities. These youth need skills and support to lead self-sufficient, healthy, productive, and stable adult lives. Youth receiving these services may be in ministry custody, living in a foster care or kinship care home, or in a residential treatment or group home setting and typically face numerous challenges due to multiple, changing living arrangements. These challenges include a lack of: connection to effective support for educational achievement and school continuity; access to employment preparation and jobs; personal financial education, competency and security; and sources of encouragement to save and start to accumulate assets.
Note: An organization that provides Counselling, Support and Education Services (CA-CSE); Mental Health and/or Substance Use Services (CA-MHSU); Case Management (CA-CM); Workforce Development Services (CA-WDS); Vocational Rehabilitation Services (CA-VOC); Family Foster Care and Kinship Care (CA-FKC); Refugee Resettlement Services (CA-RRS); Pregnancy Support Services (CA-PS); and/or Mentoring Services (CA-MS), will complete additional, complementary service sections.

Note: Please see CA-YIL Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.

Note: For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the YIL Crosswalk.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 1: Person-Centered Logic Model

The organization implements a program logic model that describes how resources and program activities will support the achievement of positive outcomes.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one client outcome has been identified for all of its programs; or
  • All but a few staff have been trained on use of therapeutic interventions and training is scheduled for the rest; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs; or
  • Several staff have not been trained on the use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of therapeutic interventions, as required; or
  • There is no process for identifying risks associated with use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs; or
  • There is no written policy or procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions; or 
  • Procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation on therapeutic interventions is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • There is evidence that clients have been harmed by inappropriate or unmonitored use of therapeutic interventions.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • See program description completed during intake
  • Program logic model that includes a list of client outcomes being measured
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel

 

CA-YIL 1.01

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies:
  1. needs the program will address;
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs);
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results;
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered);
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in service recipients); and
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system.
Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models. 

Examples: Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 
  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; 
  2. risks assessments conducted for specific interventions; and
  3. the best available evidence of service effectiveness.

Examples: CA-YIL services can addresses the attainment of foundational, short-term, achievable outcomes that lay groundwork for longer-term positive outcomes. Depending on age, time in program, and other factors, outcomes such as school graduation or training completion can either be immediate or can begin with improving on test scores or reading at or above grade level. Steps toward achieving economic self-sufficiency can include achieving such financial growth goals as completing a financial education program, understanding and obtaining a good credit rating, or building a savings account.

 

CA-YIL 1.02

The logic model identifies client outcomes in at least two of the following areas:
  1. change in clinical status;
  2. change in functional status;
  3. health, welfare, and safety;
  4. permanency of life situation; 
  5. quality of life; 
  6. achievement of individual service goals; and 
  7. other outcomes as appropriate to the program or service population.
Example: Outcomes data can be disaggregated by race or ethnicity to identify and monitor disparities in service provision or effectiveness.

 

CA-YIL 1.03

Organization policy prohibits: 

  1. corporal punishment; 
  2. the use of aversive stimuli; 
  3. interventions that involve withholding nutrition or hydration, or that inflict physical or psychological pain; 
  4. the use of demeaning, shaming, or degrading language or activities; 
  5. forced physical exercise to eliminate behaviours; 
  6. unwarranted use of invasive procedures or activities as a disciplinary action; 
  7. punitive work assignments; 
  8. punishment by peers; and 
  9. group punishment or discipline for individual behaviour. 
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 2: Personnel

Personnel have the competency and support needed to to provide services and meet the needs of youth.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CA-YIL 2.01

Personnel providing counselling and case coordination services are qualified by:
  1. a bachelor’s degree in social work or another human services field; and 
  2. two years of relevant youth work experience, including experience in case work, group work, and case coordination.

 

CA-YIL 2.02

Supervisors are qualified by:
  1. an advanced degree in social work or another related human service field; or
  2. a bachelor’s degree in social work or another related field and two years of direct service delivery experience.

 

CA-YIL 2.03

All direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. positive youth development;
  2. normative youth development and the effects of early trauma, educational gaps and delays, and abuse and neglect on youth development;
  3. public assistance programs, eligibility requirements, and benefits;
  4. local housing resources; and
  5. the community service delivery system.

 

CA-YIL 2.04

When serving severely and persistently mentally ill, HIV diagnosed, or chemically dependent youth, or youth with other special health and mental health issues, staff-to-supervisor ratios are 1:6.
NA The program is not designed to serve youth with special health or mental health needs.

 

CA-YIL 2.05

The organization minimizes the number of workers assigned to the youth over the course of their contact with the organization by:
  1. assigning a worker at intake or early in the contact; and
  2. avoiding the arbitrary or indiscriminate reassignment of direct service personnel.

 

CA-YIL 2.06

Caseloads support the achievement of youth outcomes, are regularly reviewed, and generally range between 12 and 20 cases.

Interpretation

The number of cases carried should be smaller when youth receive counselling or other intensive services, and travel a wide geographic area, than when a worker is providing primarily follow-up contact and less intensive, more centralized services.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. case complexity, special needs, and circumstances;
  2. age and population characteristics, including ethnic and cultural factors;
  3. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
  4. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities;
  5. case status, and progress toward achievement of desired outcomes; and
  6. service volume.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 3: Intake and Assessment

The organization’s intake and assessment practices ensure that youth receive prompt and responsive access to appropriate services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • In a few rare instances, urgent needs were not prioritized; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Culturally responsive assessments are the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Urgent needs are often not prioritized; or 
  • Services are frequently not initiated in a timely manner; or
  • Applicants are not receiving referrals, as appropriate; or 
  • Assessment and reassessment timeframes are often missed; or
  • Assessments are sometimes not sufficiently individualized; 
  • Culturally responsive assessments are not the norm, and this is not being addressed in supervision or training; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent; or
  • Intake or assessment is done by another organization or referral source and no documentation and/or summary of required information is present in case record. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • There are no written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Screening and intake procedures
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
  • Strategies for engaging youth
  • Community resource and referral list
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 3.01

The organization partners with community entities and providers to:
  1. identify youth with potential need; and
  2. increase youth interest and the likelihood that needed supports and services will be used.

Interpretation

This standard promotes the “no wrong door” concept that youth will not be turned away when a narrow service does not meet comprehensive need. Instead, youth should be engaged at any point of entry and should be referred to or served by an appropriate constellation of providers.

 

CA-YIL 3.02

Youth are screened and informed about:
  1. how well their request matches the organization’s services; and
  2. what services will be available and when.
NA Another organization is responsible for screening, as defined in a contract.

 

CA-YIL 3.03

The youth and worker meet within 7-14 days, or within a time period consistent with established program timeframes and guidelines, when a goal changes to independent living or referral.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YIL 3.04

Prompt, responsive, intake practices:
  1. address applicable legal protections for youth;
  2. clarify what youth need and want;
  3. gather information necessary to identify critical service needs and/or to determine if a more intensive service is necessary;
  4. provide the basis for further assessment;
  5. give priority to urgent needs and emergency situations, including health and safety concerns; 
  6. support timely initiation of services; 
  7. determine if youth are eligible to receive services and funding; and 
  8. provide placement on a waiting list or referral to appropriate resources when individuals cannot be served or cannot be served promptly.

 

CA-YIL 3.05

Prior to or at initiation of services each worker and youth:
  1. confirm the youth’s age and legal status and, as appropriate, obtain necessary, authorized, written approvals for service from a legal guardian;
  2. contact prior placements for confirmation about services the youth may have received, as appropriate; and
  3. arrange to meet where the youth is living so the worker can observe and document if the arrangement is safe, healthy, and provides suitable social, emotional, and physical care and support.

Interpretation

"Legal status” refers to whether youth are in ministry custody or are legally emancipated.

 

CA-YIL 3.06

The organization plans for, establishes, and maintains stable, on-going, goal directed caseworker-youth relationships with youth who can be unfamiliar with how to seek, accept, and use support.

 

CA-YIL 3.07

Youth participate in an individualized, culturally and linguistically responsive assessment that is:
  1. completed within established timeframes; 
  2. updated as needed based on the needs of the youth; and
  3. focused on information pertinent for meeting service requests and objectives.

 

CA-YIL 3.08

Standardized assessment tools are used in conjunction with youth input to identify:
  1. strengths, needs, challenges, and protective factors;
  2. emotional and social competence and current level of peer group and community involvement;
  3. involvement in challenging, interesting activities;
  4. family connections, and relationships with other responsible adults;
  5. availability and use of informal supports;
  6. life skills;
  7. educational status and progress toward achieving an age-appropriate educational level or school completion;
  8. housing; and
  9. physical and mental health care needs.

Interpretation

The Assessment Matrix - Private, Public, Canadian, Network determines which level of assessment is required for COA’s Service Sections. The assessment elements of the Matrix can be tailored according to the needs of specific individuals or service design.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 4: Service Planning and Monitoring

Each youth participates in the development and on-going review of a service plan that is the basis for delivery of appropriate services and support.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • With few exceptions, staff work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc.; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • In several instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • Quarterly reviews are not being done consistently; or
  • Level of care for some clients is clearly inappropriate; or
  • Service planning is often done without full client participation; or
  • Appropriate family involvement is not documented; or  
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • Individual staff members work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc., but this is the exception.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Service planning and monitoring procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 4.01

An assessment-based service plan is developed in a timely manner with the full participation of youth, and their family when appropriate, and includes:
  1. agreed upon goals, desired outcomes, and timeframes for achieving them;
  2. services and supports to be provided, and by whom; 
  3. possibilities for maintaining and strengthening family relationships and other informal social networks; 
  4. procedures for expedited service planning when crisis or urgent need is identified; and
  5. the youth’s signature.

 

CA-YIL 4.02

The worker and a supervisor, or a clinical, service, or peer team, review the case quarterly, or more frequently depending on the needs of youth, to assess:
  1. service plan implementation;
  2. progress toward achieving service goals and desired outcomes; and
  3. the continuing appropriateness of the agreed upon service goals.

Interpretation

When experienced workers are conducting reviews of their own cases, the worker’s supervisor must review a sample of the worker’s evaluations as per the requirements of the standard.

 

CA-YIL 4.03

The worker and youth, and his or her family when appropriate, participate in a review of the plan according to established timeframes to:
  1. review progress toward achievement of agreed upon service goals; and 
  2. sign revisions to service goals and plans.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 5: Service Coordination for Youth with Special Needs

Youth with special needs receive additional services that are integrated into a coordinated, goal-oriented service plan designed to promote safe and stable living, and build independence.
NA The organization does not serve youth with special needs.
Examples: “Youth with special needs” can include those with developmental disabilities and communication barriers, separated and unaccompanied minors, and immigrant and refugee youth.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for coordinating services for youth with special needs
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 5.01

Service coordination for youth with special needs supports the person’s steps toward maximum independence in the least restrictive environment.

 

CA-YIL 5.02

Youth participate in developing an inventory of competencies in personal and life skills using a standardized life skills assessment tool.

 

CA-YIL 5.03

Based on the skills inventory, the organization develops measurable goals for independence that are reviewed on an on-going basis.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 6: Supportive Housing for Youth in Transition

The organization provides safe and accessible housing in community settings where youth can continue to receive needed supports and work towards independence.
NA The organization does not provide supportive housing to youth in transition.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Acceptance procedures
  • House rules, including regarding overnight guests
  • Supervision and security procedures
  • Procedures for entering a youth's room or apartment
  • Eviction/discharge policy
  • Eviction/discharge procedures
  • Leasing and/or placement agreements, as applicable
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Observe facilities and settings

 

CA-YIL 6.01

The environment promotes a non-threatening, welcoming, and inclusive approach and fosters trust and engagement for all youth.

Interpretation

Programs should provide an affirming, safe and welcoming environment for all individuals. Youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ) are greatly overrepresented among youth experiencing homelessness. Programs can help to signal that they provide an environment that is safe and welcoming, for example, by posting “visual cues” in the reception or common area such as a nondiscrimination policy or LGBTQ symbols (i.e., posters, stickers, and flags).

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YIL 6.02

Acceptance procedures include: 
  1. fair and objective selection criteria;
  2. written notification regarding reasons for non-acceptance; and
  3. connecting youth deemed ineligible to alternative housing options.

Interpretation

Youth in transition oftentimes do not meet conventional housing criteria due to lack of sufficient income or rental histories. Organizations that provide housing to youth in transition should modify acceptance criteria – within legal, regulatory, and/or contractual boundaries – to accommodate this service population. 

 

CA-YIL 6.03

Housing is provided in settings that are readily accessible to public transportation, shopping, and community-based services and resources.

 

CA-YIL 6.04

House rules are developed with youths’ participation, and youth are encouraged to organize, self-govern, and enforce the rules.

 

CA-YIL 6.05

Youth are permitted to have guests, including overnight guests, as appropriate to the population and type of living situation, and are informed of their responsibility for the behaviour of their guests.

 

CA-YIL 6.06

The program ensures appropriate supervision and security for its youth resident population, as applicable.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YIL 6.07

Youth are notified in writing about circumstances that permit maintenance personnel to enter a room or apartment without the occupant’s permission, and receive at least 24-hours’ notice when access is required in non-emergency situations.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YIL 6.08

Written policies and procedures regarding eviction and discharge: 
  1. are provided and explained to youth at intake;
  2. are clear and simple, avoiding overly rigid and bureaucratic language and rules;
  3. define specific behaviours, conditions, or circumstances that may result in eviction and discharge;
  4. include timely due process provisions; and
  5. describe the conditions or process for re-admittance.

Interpretation

Programs should be tolerant of youth behaviours and might expect some degree of non-compliance from youth in transition. Early discharge as a disciplinary strategy can have severely negative implications for service delivery goals, and outcomes and records of eviction impact creditworthiness and can hinder youth from obtaining secure housing arrangements in the future.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 7: Family, Community, and Workplace Connections

Services and supports effectively draw upon a full range of available family, school, workplace, neighbourhood, and community resources that establish the youth as a primary resource for, and an active participant in, his or her development.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for facilitating community and socialconnections
  • Procedures for referring youth to services
  • Table of contents of educational curricula
  • Community resource and referral list
  • Informational materials provided to youth
  • Educational curricula

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 7.01

To facilitate access to all available services and active membership in the community, the organization:
  1. remains knowledgeable about local, regional, and provincial resources, including networking and leadership opportunities; and
  2. finds and creates opportunities for individuals to develop positive ties to the community based on mutual interests and abilities.

 

CA-YIL 7.02

The organization strives to engage youth directly as key partners, and to promote sufficient relevant resources, by encouraging youth participation in local or provincial leadership and advocacy activities, including community advisory and partnership groups.

 

CA-YIL 7.03

Program activities facilitate:
  1. youth-family connections;
  2. development of social support networks and healthy, meaningful relationships with caring individuals; 
  3. participation in peer group activities where they can meet, lend support, and share positive experiences; and
  4. a coordinated response to youth interests and needs.
Examples: “Caring individuals” may include mentors, community members, friends, siblings, and other family members.

 

CA-YIL 7.04

Youth have the opportunity to develop a comprehensive set of daily living, social, and communication skills, including:
  1. money management, including budgeting, saving, investing, and building credit;
  2. use of community resources;
  3. accessing public assistance;
  4. nutrition and food preparation;
  5. stress management and coping;
  6. time management;
  7. relationship building, effective communication, and conflict resolution;
  8. problem solving and decision making;
  9. hygiene, self-care, and personal safety; and
  10. exercising legal rights and responsibilities, such as voting.

 

CA-YIL 7.05

The organization provides support or housing services, including:
  1. information on obtaining housing and household management;
  2. education regarding available community housing options;
  3. education on tenant rights and responsibilities;
  4. assistance obtaining a safe, growth-enhancing living environment; and
  5. advocacy for safe, affordable, appropriate housing for youth with a goal of independent living.

 

CA-YIL 7.06

Youth receive help locating and/or enrolling in educational or vocational programs appropriate to their needs, interests and abilities, including:
  1. high school or GED programs;
  2. colleges or universities;
  3. vocational training programs; and
  4. special education services.

 

CA-YIL 7.07

Youth are helped to obtain and maintain employment, including assistance with:
  1. development of good work habits, skills, and self-awareness essential to sustained employment;
  2. development of self-confidence and presentation skills;
  3. resume writing, completion of job applications, and preparation for interviews;
  4. access to and use of employment information and data to understand job options, and clarify current and future work aspirations; and
  5. use of local employment resources, job finding, and placement options, including on-the-job training.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YIL 7.08

Youth are linked to necessary health services, including:
  1. medical services, such as routine care and medication management or monitoring;
  2. dental services;
  3. counselling, mental health services, and chemical dependency services;
  4. age-appropriate education regarding family planning, HIV/AIDS, and STD prevention, and general information about the prevention and treatment of disease; and
  5. insurance coverage.

 

CA-YIL 7.09

Youth receive additional support services, as needed, including:
  1. crisis intervention;
  2. transportation;
  3. legal assistance, including assistance with citizenship and naturalization;
  4. parent education and family support;
  5. child care and development; and
  6. activities that support social, cultural, and recreational interests, and religious observance.
Examples: Opportunities to participate in culturally appropriate social, cultural, recreational, and religious activities can help to expand the range of life experiences, and meet the needs of indigenous groups or individuals with special needs.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 8: Transition from the Service System

Youth participate in planning for transition to the community and are prepared for adulthood with positive experiences and skills to move successfully to living and managing on their own.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Transition planning procedures
  • Information provided to youth
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 8.01

The organization prepares youth for a successful transition by providing youth and collaborating providers:
  1. transfer or termination of custody information, as applicable;
  2. information about rights and services to which the person may have access as a result of a disability;
  3. information needed to access specialized services and navigate adult-serving systems;
  4. information about availability of community resources, including counselling;
  5. court and public assistance systems information;
  6. child care services information; and
  7. support through community volunteers or individuals who have made a successful transition, as appropriate.

 

CA-YIL 8.02

During the transition process, and prior to case closing, the organization explores the full range of living situations, from supported living to fully independent living environments, with youth and engages them in an evaluation of the risks and benefits of various housing options.

Interpretation

Personnel providing housing support services to LGBTQ youth should consider the sexual orientation, gender identification, and personal preferences of youth when matching them with available housing options. LGBTQ youth are disproportionately subjected to sexual and physical violence which may make certain living accommodations, such as open bathing facilities or single-sex communal facilities, less desirable for this demographic.

 

CA-YIL 8.03

The organization ensures that an adequate living arrangement is in place for every person transitioning to independence and provides: 
  1. supervised household management practice, when possible; 
  2. tenancy and landlord supports, as appropriate; and
  3. support when needed to address potential landlord-tenant issues impacting youth residents.

 

CA-YIL 8.04

For every person transitioning to independence, the organization ensures that basic resources are in place, including:
  1. a source of income;
  2. access to at least one committed, caring adult; and
  3. access to positive peer support.

 

CA-YIL 8.05

The organization provides youth transitioning to independence with six months minimum advance notice of the cessation of any health, financial, educational or other benefits that will occur at transition or case closing.

 

CA-YIL 8.06

The organization assists youth in obtaining or compiling documents necessary to function as an independent adult, including:
  1. an identification card;
  2. a social insurance number;
  3. a resume, when work experience can be described;
  4. a driver’s licence, when the ability to drive is a goal;
  5. medical records and documentation, including a provincial health services card or other health eligibility documentation;
  6. an original copy of the youth’s birth certificate;
  7. religious documents and information, when appropriate;
  8. documentation of immigration, citizenship, or naturalization, when applicable;
  9. death certificates when parents are deceased;
  10. a life book or a compilation of personal history and photographs, as appropriate;
  11. a list of known relatives, with relationships, addresses, telephone numbers, and permissions for contacting involved parties;
  12. previous placement information; and
  13. educational records, such as high school diploma or GED, and a list of schools attended, when age-appropriate.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Independent Living Services (CA-YIL) 9: Case Closing and Aftercare

The organization works with youth to plan for case closing and, when possible, to provide aftercare.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,   
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, the organization terminated services inappropriately; or  
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent; or
  • A formal case closing evaluation is not consistently provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Services are frequently terminated inappropriately; or  
  • Aftercare planning is not initiated early enough to ensure orderly transitions; or
  • A formal case closing summary and assessment is seldom provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard; or  
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing. 
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Case closing procedures
  • Aftercare and follow-up procedures
  • Relevant portions of contract with public authority, as applicable
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth
  • Review case records

 

CA-YIL 9.01

Planning for case closing:
  1. is a clearly defined process that includes assignment of staff responsibility;
  2. begins at intake; and
  3. involves the worker, the youth, and others, as appropriate to the needs and wishes of the youth.

 

CA-YIL 9.02

Upon case closing, the organization notifies any collaborating service providers, as appropriate.

 

CA-YIL 9.03

If an individual has to leave the program unexpectedly, the organization makes every effort to identify other service options and link the youth with appropriate services.

Interpretation

The organization must determine on a case-by-case basis its responsibility to continue providing services to persons whose third-party benefits are denied or have ended and who are in critical situations.

 

CA-YIL 9.04

As a continuing resource for information, crisis management, referral, and support, the organization provides each person with:
  1. a transition plan summary, including the individual’s options;
  2. a list of emergency contacts, and
  3. the organization’s contact information.

 

CA-YIL 9.05

The organization follows up on the transition or aftercare plan, as appropriate, when possible, and with the permission of the youth.
NA The organization has a contract with a public authority that prohibits or does not include aftercare or transition planning follow-up.
Examples: Reasons why follow-up may not be appropriate include, but are not limited to, cases where the person’s participation is involuntary, or where there may be a risk to the individual such as in cases of domestic violence.
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