CA-YPS Standard. Generated 9/25/2022. ©2022 Council on Accreditation.
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services Definition

Purpose

Youth participating in Psychosocial Services receive community based services that facilitate childhood development and resiliency using a holistic approach that improves family functioning and increases child well-being and safety.

Definition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) provide an interdisciplinary, psychoeducational, and therapeutic program to engage youth in a variety of cognitive, physical, and social activities appropriate to their needs, interests, and abilities in order to promote healthy development.  

Many youth who benefit from youth psychosocial services have complex needs, requiring service planning with multiple service sectors. In order to meet these needs many programs use the wraparound approach of service planning to provide intensive, individualized care with the goal of maintaining the youth in the home and the community, or the appropriate least restrictive setting. While it is not necessary to use Wraparound services when providing psychosocial rehabilitation to youth, the research supports that participation in Wraparound services sustains youths’ ongoing participation in services. An organization may engage in a wraparound approach without being a wraparound program. The aim of these programs is to engage the youth, family/primary caregiver, and all service providers to develop and implement a plan with shared goals and outcomes. The main effort of these programs may not be to provide direct service, but they still fall under the umbrella of youth psychosocial programs and benefit from these standards. For programs that offer solely wraparound services, documentation of the other services to which youth are connected will suffice.
Note: The term ‘youth’ refers to individuals between the ages of 3 and 21 whose developmental needs can be met through engagement in a psychosocial rehabilitation program and who have a primary caregiver.

Note: While addressing the needs of the youth is the primary goal of youth psychosocial rehabilitation programs, oftentimes it is essential to provide support for the family/primary caregiver and engage them in services as well. Organizations should work with the youth to understand their definition of “family” in order for youth to develop and sustain permanent, lifelong connections.

Note: Standards CA-YPS 3.03 and CA-YPS 3.04 are for Wraparound-specific programs only.

Note: Please see CA-YPS Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards. 

Note: For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the YPS Crosswalk.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 1: Person-Centered Logic Model

The organization implements a program logic model that describes how resources and program activities will support the achievement of positive outcomes.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one client outcome has been identified for all of its programs; or
  • All but a few staff have been trained on use of therapeutic interventions and training is scheduled for the rest; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs; or
  • Several staff have not been trained on the use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of therapeutic interventions, as required; or
  • There is no process for identifying risks associated with use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs; or
  • There is no written policy or procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions; or 
  • Procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation on therapeutic interventions is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • There is evidence that clients have been harmed by inappropriate or unmonitored use of therapeutic interventions.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • See program description completed during intake
  • Program logic model that includes a list of outcomes being measured
  • Procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions
  • Policy for prohibited interventions
  • Training curricula that addresses therapeutic interventions
  • Documentation of training and/or certification related to therapeutic interventions
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel

 

CA-YPS 1.01

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies:
  1. needs the program will address;
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs);
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results;
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered); 
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in service recipients); and
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system.
Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models.  
 
Examples: Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 
  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; 
  2. risks assessments conducted for specific interventions; and
  3. the best available evidence of service effectiveness. 

 

CA-YPS 1.02

The logic model identifies client outcomes in at least two of the following areas:
  1. change in clinical status;
  2. change in functional status;
  3. health, welfare, and safety;
  4. permanency of life situation; 
  5. quality of life; 
  6. achievement of individual service goals; and 
  7. other outcomes as appropriate to the program or service population.
Example: Outcomes data can be disaggregated by race or ethnicity to identify and monitor disparities in service provision or effectiveness.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YPS 1.03

The organization:
  1. ensures staff are trained on therapeutic interventions prior to coming in contact with the service population;
  2. monitors the use and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions;
  3. identifies potential risks associated with therapeutic interventions and takes appropriate steps to minimize risk, when necessary; and
  4. discontinues an intervention immediately if it produces adverse side effects or is deemed unacceptable according to prevailing professional standards.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YPS 1.04

Organization policy prohibits:
  1. corporal punishment;
  2. the use of aversive stimuli;
  3. interventions that involve withholding nutrition or hydration, or that inflict physical or psychological pain;
  4. the use of demeaning, shaming, or degrading language or activities;
  5. forced physical exercise to eliminate behaviours;
  6. unwarranted use of invasive procedures or activities as a disciplinary action;
  7. punitive work assignments;
  8. punishment by peers; and
  9. group punishment or discipline for individual behaviour.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 2: Personnel

Personnel providing youth psychosocial or wraparound services have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of the youth served.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CA-YPS 2.01

Personnel providing direct services are qualified by: 
  1. a bachelor’s degree in a health-related field;
  2. an associate’s degree in a health-related field and minimum of one year of experience;
  3. 30 hours, or their equivalent, of college credit toward a bachelor’s degree in a health-related field and 1 year of experience; or
  4. two years of work experience in a supervised mental health setting.

 

CA-YPS 2.02

Direct service supervisors are qualified according to services provided, program design, and regulations and by one or more of the following:
  1. an advanced degree in a human services field and a minimum of two years professional experience;
  2. substantial experience in the psychosocial rehabilitation field which, based on the organization’s decision, substitutes for specific educational requirements; and/or
  3. federal or provincial certification, licensing, or registration in the psychosocial or psychiatric rehabilitation field.

 

CA-YPS 2.03

The program is under the direction of a rehabilitation specialist who has a minimum of 2 years direct care experience working with youth with a serious emotional disorder, and who is:
  1. a licensed mental health professional; or
  2. certified by Psychiatric Rehabilitation Canada/Réadaption Psychosociale Canada (PSR/RPS Canada) and has obtained the PSR/RPS Canada Children’s Psychiatric Rehabilitation Certificate.

Interpretation

Rehabilitation specialists may have a dual role of supervisor and program director, if their workload permits.

 

CA-YPS 2.04

A rehabilitation specialist is employed for:
  1. at least 20 hours per week when the program serves less than 30 youth; or
  2. at least 40 hours per week when the program serves 30 or more youth.

 

CA-YPS 2.05

Direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. partnering and engaging with families;
  2. the use, management, and side effects of psychotropic medications;
  3. youth psychiatric rehabilitation process and evidence based practises;
  4. the needs of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or gender non-conforming;
  5. the characteristics and treatment of emotional or behavioural problems of youth; and
  6. recovery and recognizing the risk factors that increase vulnerability to relapse.

 

CA-YPS 2.06

The organization maintains service continuity for youth by:
  1. assigning a worker early in the contact, when appropriate; and
  2. minimizing the number of workers assigned to an individual over the course of their contact with the organization.

 

CA-YPS 2.07

Employee workloads support the achievement of youth outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of clients.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 3: Rehabilitation Team

The rehabilitation team consists of professionals that represent each sector providing services to the youth as well as the youth themselves, the primary caregiver, and any appropriate family members or natural supports.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to team coordination of care and case assignment
  • List of the rehabilitation team members and their roles (including child and family/primary caregiver team members if providing Wraparound services)
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review case records

 

CA-YPS 3.01

The rehabilitation team, with input from the youth and primary caregiver, coordinates services with specialty mental health, substance use treatment, education, child protection, primary health care, and juvenile justice, as appropriate.

Interpretation

If the organization does not provide any of the services listed above, such as may be the case for Wraparound programs, then it must formally document how those youth’s needs are being met. If the services are not necessary for the youth (e.g., they are not involved with juvenile justice at all), it should be documented that the youth was assessed for those needs and it was determined unnecessary.

 

CA-YPS 3.02

A lead worker serves as the primary point of contact for the youth and family/primary caregiver in the service planning process to:
  1. perform a strengths-based assessment;
  2. conduct plan-of-care meeting;
  3. help to determine needs and resources;
  4. arrange for provision of specific services; and
  5. monitor implementation of the service plan.
Examples: A point of contact may have a different title from organization to organization, for example wraparound programs would refer to this individual as the care coordinator.

 

CA-YPS 3.03

The wraparound care coordination team includes a care coordinator, personnel providing services from each sector, the child and family team, a mobile crisis team, and a provider network.
NA The organization does not provide wraparound services.
Examples: The child and family team may consist of the youth and, in addition to the primary caregiver, all adults and family members that play a positive role in the youth’s life as well as provide natural community support. Child and family teams can also include a family support partner (also referred to as a family support specialist) who is a parent who has had similar experiences with their own family and as a result has an understanding of the various systems and is able to provide support to the other adults to help them find their voice.

 

CA-YPS 3.04

Prior to a crisis situation, youth and their primary caregivers are informed about how to access the mobile crisis team, which includes psychologists and social workers trained in crisis intervention, when the care coordinator is not available.

Interpretation

When permitted by local or provincial regulation, the organization may contract with a third party, such as a community crisis hotline, to provide crisis assistance.
NA The organization does not provide wraparound services.
Examples: A mobile crisis team may be of use when the care coordinator is not available to review a potential inpatient psychiatric hospitalization of a youth.

 

CA-YPS 3.05

The organization creates a provider network by cultivating a relationship with an array of service providers to help support the youth and family/primary caregiver’s needs.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 4: Intake and Assessment

The organization’s intake and assessment practises ensure that youth receive prompt and responsive access to appropriate services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • In a few rare instances, urgent needs were not prioritized; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Culturally responsive assessments are the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Urgent needs are often not prioritized; or 
  • Services are frequently not initiated in a timely manner; or
  • Applicants are not receiving referrals, as appropriate; or 
  • Assessment and reassessment timeframes are often missed; or
  • Assessments are sometimes not sufficiently individualized; 
  • Culturally responsive assessments are not the norm, and this is not being addressed in supervision or training; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent; or
  • Intake or assessment is done by another organization or referral source and no documentation and/or summary of required information is present in case record. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • There are no written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Screening and intake procedures
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
  • Written intake materials
  • Community resource and referral list
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review case records

 

CA-YPS 4.01

The organization defines in writing:
  1. eligibility criteria, including age, developmental stage, and custodial status;
  2. scope of services and supports, special areas of expertise, and range of behavioural/emotional concerns addressed;
  3. opportunities for active family participation and support; and
  4. opportunities for active participation in community activities.

 

CA-YPS 4.02

Youth and primary caregivers are screened and informed about:
  1. how well their request matches the organization's services; and
  2. what services will be available and when.
NA Another organization is responsible for screening, as defined in a contract. 

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YPS 4.03

Prompt, responsive intake practises:
  1. gather information necessary to identify critical service needs and/or determine when a more intensive service is necessary;
  2. give priority to urgent needs and emergency situations;
  3. support timely initiation of services; and
  4. provide placement on a waiting list or referral to appropriate resources when youth cannot be served or cannot be served promptly.

Interpretation

When it is not possible to directly connect youth to services, documentation of the reason why should be provided in the case record, for example, when youth are moved by the ministry.
 

Interpretation

Vulnerable populations, such as youth that are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ), are at high risk of violence and harassment. The organization should ensure these youth are safe, welcomed by staff, and are treated with respect. For example, providing intake forms that allow youth to self-identify their gender as well as their first name and preferred pronouns can support that effort.
 
Examples: Organizations can respond to identified suicide risk by connecting youth to more intensive services; facilitating the development of a safety and/or crisis plan; or contacting emergency responders, 24-hour mobile crisis teams, emergency crisis intervention services, crisis stabilisation, or 24-hour crisis hotlines, as appropriate.

 

CA-YPS 4.04

Youth participate in an individualized, culturally, and linguistically responsive assessment that is:
  1. completed within established timeframes;  
  2. updated as needed based on the needs of youth; and
  3. focused on information pertinent for meeting service requests and objectives. 

Interpretation

Youth who have been the victims of human-trafficking will oftentimes have severe deficiencies in their educational, emotional, and physical development in addition to any serious emotional disturbance or behavioural issues they may be struggling with. If at any time during the assessment it becomes apparent that the youth has been a victim of human trafficking, particular attention should be placed in those areas.

 

CA-YPS 4.05

Youth are assessed for:
  1. a history and presence of emotional and behavioural problems, substance use and other health conditions; 
  2. educational status, including enrollment in early childhood education or school; 
  3. developmental history;
  4. traumatic experiences and trauma-related symptomatology;
  5. past or present connection to the juvenile justice system;
  6. medical history, including past medication prescriptions and efficacy; 
  7. life skills and community support; and
  8. resource needs of the family/primary caregiver. 

Interpretation

The Assessment Matrix - Private, Public, Canadian, Network determines which level of assessment is required for COA’s Service Sections. The assessment elements of the Matrix can be tailored according to the needs of specific individuals or service design.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 5: Service Planning and Monitoring

Youth participate in the development and ongoing review of a service plan that is the basis for delivery of appropriate services and supports.
Examples: Service sectors frequently accessed by youth include: specialty mental health, substance use treatment, education, child protection, general medicine, and juvenile justice.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • With few exceptions, staff work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc.; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • In several instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • Quarterly reviews are not being done consistently; or
  • Level of care for some clients is clearly inappropriate; or
  • Service planning is often done without full client participation; or
  • Appropriate family involvement is not documented; or  
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • Individual staff members work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc., but this is the exception.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Service planning and monitoring procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review case records

 

CA-YPS 5.01

An assessment-based service plan is developed in a timely manner with the full participation of the youth and their family/primary caregiver, and includes:
  1. agreed upon goals, desired outcomes, and timeframes for achieving them;
  2. services and supports to be provided, and by whom; 
  3. possibilities for maintaining and strengthening family relationships and other informal social networks; 
  4. procedures for expedited service planning when crisis or urgent need is identified; and
  5. the youth’s signature.

Interpretation

If the youth has been identified as a victim of human trafficking, the organization should work with the youth and their primary caregiver to develop a safety plan that focuses on increasing physical safety by securing needed documents, property, and services and linking efficiently to law enforcement, if needed.

Interpretation

Noting experiences with family rejection and opportunities for increasing family acceptance and support should be part of the assessment for family relationships and the service plan should include culturally appropriate education and guidance to help families with LGBTQ youth decrease family rejection and increase family support.

 

CA-YPS 5.02

The service plan addresses, as appropriate:
  1. unmet service and support needs;
  2. psychological and emotional needs;
  3. educational goals;
  4. cultural interests;
  5. development of life skills, including preparation to work or continuation of schooling; and
  6. improvement in the person’s quality of life and necessary skills to remain within the community.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-YPS 5.03

Youth and their primary caregivers work with the service provider to create a crisis or safety management plan that addresses ways to prevent escalation of youth’s behaviour and identify steps to take in the event of a crisis.

 

CA-YPS 5.04

The worker and a supervisor, or a clinical, service, or peer team, review the service plan quarterly, or more frequently depending on the needs of youth, to assess:
  1. service plan implementation;
  2. progress toward achieving service goals and desired outcomes; and
  3. the continuing appropriateness of the service goals.

Interpretation

When experienced workers are conducting reviews of their own cases, the worker’s supervisor must review a sample of the worker’s evaluations as per the requirements of the standard.

 

CA-YPS 5.05

The worker, youth, and his or her family/primary caregiver:
  1. review progress toward achievement of agreed upon service goals; and 
  2. sign revisions to service goals and plans.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 6: Psychosocial Interventions

The program encourages youth to achieve their highest level of functioning by addressing specific emotional or behavioural needs and helping them to enhance coping skills. 
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Program curriculum or sample daily program schedule
  • Community resource and referral list
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review case records
  • Observe the program

 

CA-YPS 6.01

The program offers at least two of the following services:
  1. counselling or supportive therapy, including individual therapy, group therapy, and family therapy;
  2. peer support;
  3. case management;
  4. community-based activities; and
  5. recreational activities.

Interpretation

If the organization primarily acts as a coordinator rather than as a provider, as might be the case for Wraparound services, then they should document which of the services are provided by the partnering organizations.

 

CA-YPS 6.02

Core service components focus on helping youth improve and manage the quality of their lives by supporting the following:
  1. development of self-care and activities of daily living skills, such as personal hygiene and nutrition;
  2. medication compliance and an understanding of how to manage their illness/condition;
  3. socialization and effective communication;
  4. recreational and leisure time activities;
  5. organizational skills management;
  6. anger management;
  7. coping skills;
  8. conflict skill training;
  9. management of finances, if age appropriate; and
  10. vocational and/or educational development, depending on the age of the youth.

 

CA-YPS 6.03

The program offers youth a variety of opportunities to achieve service goals through individual, group, and/or milieu activities focused on:
  1. learning how to relate positively to others;
  2. anticipating and controlling behaviours that interfere with inclusion in the community;
  3. experiencing peer support and feedback;
  4. developing personal awareness and boundaries;
  5. engaging in positive problem solving methods;
  6. building on strengths and enhancing self-reliance and productivity; and
  7. celebrating competence and success.

 

CA-YPS 6.04

The organization directly provides, coordinates, or formally arranges for:
  1. 24-hour crisis intervention;
  2. crisis residential and other emergency services;
  3. inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services;
  4. medical and dental services;
  5. medication management;
  6. integrated mental health and substance use education and services;
  7. education-related services and assistance; 
  8. employment and life skills training; and
  9. legal advocacy and representation.

 

CA-YPS 6.05

The families/primary caregivers of youth are offered or referred to community services, including:
  1. family psychoeducation;
  2. emotional support and therapy;
  3. self-help referrals; and
  4. care coordination, as needed.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 7: Social and Community Connections

Youth cultivate and sustain connections with their community and social support network to promote positive well-being.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for facilitating social and community connections
  • Policy that prohibits exploitation of youth in employment-related training or jobs
  • Informational materials made available to families
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review of case records
  • Observe a variety of activities

 

CA-YPS 7.01

The organization facilitates the youth’s ability to access all available services and successfully reintegrate into their community by: 
  1. remaining knowledgeable about local, regional, and provincial resources, including networking and leadership opportunities; and
  2. identifying and developing opportunities for youth to develop positive ties to the community based on mutual interests and abilities.

 

CA-YPS 7.02

Social and community connections are encouraged by providing or sharing information about opportunities for youth and their families/primary caregiver to participate in:
  1. social, recreational, educational, or vocational activities in their community;
  2. religious observances in the faith group or spirituality of choice; and
  3. family and neighborhood activities consistent with the youth’s ethnic and cultural heritage and tribal affiliation.

 

CA-YPS 7.03

The program provides most of its services in the community and works with youth to:
  1. effectively navigate the surrounding environment;
  2. identify and use natural resources and peer support to create a supportive community;
  3. develop social support networks and build healthy, meaningful relationships with caring individuals of their choosing; and
  4. participate in group activities where they can meet, support, and share experiences with peers.

Interpretation

Organizations should tailor life skills training to meet the age and developmental level of the youth being served.
Examples: “Caring individuals” may include mentors, community members, friends, classmates, peers, siblings, cousins, grandparents, former resource families, and extended family members.

 

CA-YPS 7.04

The organization:
  1. makes reasonable efforts to match training and employment opportunities to the goals and interests of youth; and
  2. prohibits exploitation of youth in employment-related training or gainful employment.
NA The organization does not provide employment-related training or jobs to youth.
 
2022 Edition

Youth Psychosocial Services (CA-YPS) 8: Case Closing and Aftercare

The organization works with youth and their family/primary caregiver to plan for case closing and, when possible, to develop aftercare plans.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,   
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, the organization terminated services inappropriately; or  
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent; or
  • A formal case closing evaluation is not consistently provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Services are frequently terminated inappropriately; or  
  • Aftercare planning is not initiated early enough to ensure orderly transitions; or
  • A formal case closing summary and assessment is seldom provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard; or  
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing. 
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Case closing procedures
  • Aftercare planning and follow-up procedures
  • Relevant portions of contract with public authority, as applicable
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Youth served
  • Review case records

 

CA-YPS 8.01

Planning for case closing:
  1. is a clearly defined process that includes assignment of staff responsibility;
  2. begins at intake; and
  3. involves worker, youth, family members/primary caregiver, and others, as appropriate to the needs and wishes of the youth.

 

CA-YPS 8.02

Upon case closing, the organization notifies any collaborating service providers, as appropriate.

 

CA-YPS 8.03

If the youth has to leave the program unexpectedly, the organization makes every effort to identify other service options and link the person with appropriate services.

Interpretation

The organization must determine on a case-by-case basis its responsibility to continue providing services to persons whose third-party benefits are denied or have ended and who are in critical situations.

 

CA-YPS 8.04

When appropriate, the organization works with the youth and their family/primary caregiver to:
  1. develop an aftercare plan, sufficiently in advance of case closing, that identifies short- and long-term needs and goals and facilitates the initiation or continuation of needed supports and services; or
  2. conduct a formal case closing evaluation, including an assessment of unmet need, when the organization has a contract with a public authority that does not include aftercare planning or follow-up.

 

CA-YPS 8.05

The organization follows up on the aftercare plan, as appropriate, when possible, and with the permission of youth and their families/primary caregivers.
NA The organization has a contract with a public authority that prohibits or does not include aftercare planning or follow-up.
Examples: Reasons why follow-up may not be appropriate, include, but are not limited to, cases where the person’s participation is involuntary, or where there may be a risk to the individual such as in cases of domestic violence.
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