2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services Definition

Purpose

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services support children, youth, and adults to achieve full integration and inclusion in the mainstream, make choices, exert control over their lives, and fully participate in, and contribute to, their communities.

Definition

COA’s Standards for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) apply to programs and services whose focus is working with the IDDS population, or when individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are a significant proportion of the service population.

Interpretation

Throughout this document the term "individual" is defined to include children, youth, and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. In instances where the individual cannot make his or her own decisions, sign documents, or is otherwise limited in his or her ability to provide informed consent, the term "individual" may be understood to also include an advocate or legal guardian, as in "...the individual, his/her advocate, or legal guardian..."

"Team" is defined to include the individual’s family, friends and other natural supports, circle of support, support/service broker, service coordinator, or others chosen by the individual. It is essential that members of the person’s team are, to the extent possible, chosen by, and are the preference of the individual.

Note:Please see the IDDS Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.


Note:For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the IDDS Crosswalk.


2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 1: Person-Centered Logic Model

The organization implements a program model that describes a logical approach for how program activities and interventions will meet the needs of persons served and support the achievement of positive outcomes.
NotePlease see the Logic Model Template for additional guidance on this standard.  
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one client outcome has been identified for all of its programs; or
  • All but a few staff have been trained on use of therapeutic interventions and training is scheduled for the rest; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs; or
  • Several staff have not been trained on the use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of therapeutic interventions, as required; or
  • There is no process for identifying risks associated with use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs; or
  • There is no written policy or procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions; or 
  • Procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation on therapeutic interventions is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • There is evidence that clients have been harmed by inappropriate or unmonitored use of therapeutic interventions.
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • See program description completed during intake
  • Program logic model that includes a list of outcomes being measured
  • Policy for prohibited interventions
  • Procedures for use of interventions that limit movement, diminish sensory experience, limit personal freedom, or cause personal discomfort
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff

 

IDDS 1.01

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies:
  1. needs the program will address;
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs);
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results;
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered); 
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in service recipients); and
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system.
Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models.  
 
Examples: Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 
  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; 
  2. risks assessments conducted for specific interventions; and
  3. the best available evidence of service effectiveness. 

 

IDDS 1.02

The logic model identifies client outcomes in at least two of the following areas:
  1. change in clinical status;
  2. change in functional status;
  3. health, welfare, and safety;
  4. permanency of life situation;
  5. quality of life;
  6. achievement of individual service goals; and
  7. other outcomes as appropriate to the program or service population.

Interpretation: Outcomes data should be disaggregated to identify patterns of disparity or inequity that can be masked by aggregate data reporting. See PQI 5.02 for more information on disaggregating data to track and monitor identified outcomes. 


 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 1.03

Organization policy prohibits:
  1. corporal punishment;
  2. the use of aversive stimuli;
  3. interventions that involve withholding nutrition or hydration, or that inflict physical or psychological pain;
  4. the use of demeaning, shaming, or degrading language or activities;
  5. forced physical exercise to eliminate behaviors;
  6. unwarranted use of invasive procedures or activities as a disciplinary action;
  7. punitive work assignments;
  8. punishment by peers; and
  9. group punishment or discipline for individual behavior.

 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 1.04

If the organization uses interventions that limit physical movement, diminish sensory experience, restrict personal freedoms, or cause personal discomfort, such interventions are implemented only when:
  1. the organization can document its reasons for believing that the intervention will be beneficial to the individual;
  2. the individual or his or her guardian has been fully informed about the risks and benefits of the intervention and has consented to it;
  3. the intervention is prescribed by a qualified medial practitioner or recommended by an interdisciplinary team;
  4. the organization periodically reviews the continued need for and effectiveness of the treatment or intervention;
  5. all direct service personnel working with an individual has been trained on their specific treatment plan and its parameters; and
  6. the intervention is not used as a substitute for appropriate staffing patterns, for the convenience of staff, or as punishment.
Interpretation: In regards to element (c), the prescription should include the specific parameters of the use of the intervention, including a time limit and specific set of behaviors or circumstances that the intervention should be applied.
NA The organization does not use interventions that limit physical movement, diminish sensory experience, restrict personal freedoms, or cause personal discomfort.
Examples: Examples of such treatments and interventions may include: use of splints or poseys to prevent self-injury; use of visual or auditory screens to reduce stimulation, and the use of distasteful substances, textures, or activities as a consequence for behavior.

 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 1.05

The organization:
  1. ensures personnel are trained on therapeutic interventions prior to coming in contact with the service population;
  2. monitors the use and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions;
  3. identifies potential risks associated with therapeutic interventions and takes appropriate steps to minimize risk, when necessary; and
  4. discontinues an intervention immediately if it produces adverse side effects or is deemed unacceptable according to prevailing professional standards.

Note: Therapeutic Interventions do not include restrictive behavior management techniques, which are addressed in Behavior Support and Management (BSM ). Please see the glossary definition for Therapeutic Interventions for additional guidance on this standard.

2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 2: Personnel

Direct support personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services, supports, and other forms of direct assistance.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Table of contents of training curricula
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

IDDS 2.01

Direct support personnel have a high school degree or equivalent and are trained on or demonstrate competency in:
  1. interaction and communication techniques;
  2. implementation of person-centered service plans;
  3. implementing the principles of self-determination and inclusion;
  4. de-escalation techniques in relation to this population;
  5. use of assistive technology;
  6. teaching ADLs; and
  7. recognizing and addressing abuse, neglect, and exploitation.

 

IDDS 2.02

Direct support personnel are trained or demonstrate competency in the following, as appropriate to the service and needs of individuals served:
  1. positive behavioral supports;
  2. assisted dining techniques and good nutrition;
  3. lifting and transfer techniques;
  4. safe transportation techniques;
  5. health related supports; and
  6. medication administration.

 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 2.03

There is at least one person on duty at each program site any time the program is in operation that has received first aid and age-appropriate CPR training in the previous two years that included an in-person, hands-on CPR skills assessment conducted by a certified CPR instructor.

 

IDDS 2.04

The organization minimizes the number of workers assigned to the family over the course of their contact with the organization by:
  1. assigning a worker at intake or early in the contact; and
  2. avoiding the arbitrary or indiscriminate reassignment of direct service personnel.

 

IDDS 2.05

Caseload size and case assignments are sufficiently small to permit direct support personnel to respond flexibly to the differing service needs of individuals and their families, and to support the achievement of client outcomes.
Examples: Examples of factors that may be considered when determining employee caseloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker, including the level of supervision needed;
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of persons served.
2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 3: Intake and Assessment

The organization’s screening and assessment practices ensure that individuals receive prompt and responsive access to appropriate services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • In a few rare instances, urgent needs were not prioritized; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Culturally responsive assessments are the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Urgent needs are often not prioritized; or 
  • Services are frequently not initiated in a timely manner; or
  • Applicants are not receiving referrals, as appropriate; or 
  • Assessment and reassessment timeframes are often missed; or
  • Assessments are sometimes not sufficiently individualized; 
  • Culturally responsive assessments are not the norm, and this is not being addressed in supervision or training; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent; or
  • Intake or assessment is done by another organization or referral source and no documentation and/or summary of required information is present in case record. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • There are no written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Screening and intake procedures
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tools
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records

 

IDDS 3.01

Individuals are screened and informed about:
  1. how their request matches the organization's services; and
  2. what services will be available and when.
NA The organization accepts all referrals, as defined in a contract.

 

IDDS 3.02

The individual is the primary source of information about the need for service.

 

IDDS 3.03

Prompt, responsive intake practices:
  1. include assignment of a primary contact person within the organization;
  2. give priority to urgent needs and emergency situations;
  3. support timely initiation of services; and
  4. provide placement on a waiting list or referral to appropriate resources when individuals cannot be served or cannot be served promptly.
Examples: The primary contact can be an organization-wide contact or someone specific to the program or programs being used by the individual. 

 

IDDS 3.04

Persons served participate in an individualized, culturally and linguistically responsive assessment that is:
  1. completed within established timeframes;  
  2. updated as needed based on the needs of persons served; and
  3. focused on information pertinent for meeting service requests and objectives.

Interpretation: The Assessment Matrix - Private, Public, Canadian, Network determines which level of assessment is required for COA’s Service Sections. The assessment elements of the Matrix can be tailored according to the needs of specific individuals or service design.

2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 4: Service Planning and Monitoring

Person-centered service planning engages persons with developmental disabilities and their team as primary decision makers regarding the services and supports they receive.
Interpretation: Generally, all decisions are made with the informed consent of the individual or guardian. Unless otherwise noted, informed consent is not necessarily written; however, the fact that consent was given should be noted in the individual's case record.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • With few exceptions, staff work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc.; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • In several instances, client or staff signatures are missing and/or not dated; or
  • Quarterly reviews are not being done consistently; or
  • Level of care for some clients is clearly inappropriate; or
  • Service planning is often done without full client participation; or
  • Appropriate family involvement is not documented; or  
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • Individual staff members work with persons served, when appropriate, to help them receive needed support, access services, mediate barriers, etc., but this is the exception.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Service planning and monitoring procedures
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records

 

IDDS 4.01

The organization works in partnership with the individual, and his or her team according to the wishes of the individual, to develop and implement a plan that enables the fullest and most independent life possible in the community and promotes self-determination.

 

IDDS 4.02

Individuals with limited ability to make independent decisions receive help from the team in making choices and/or assuming responsibility for making decisions.

 

IDDS 4.03

An assessment-based service plan is developed in a timely manner with the full participation of persons served, and their family when appropriate, and includes:
  1. agreed upon goals, desired outcomes, and timeframes for achieving them;
  2. services and supports to be provided, and by whom;
  3. a means for resolving conflicts, and possibilities for maintaining and strengthening family relationships and other informal social networks;
  4. procedures for expedited service planning when crisis or urgent need is identified; and
  5. the individual’s signature.

 

IDDS 4.04

The organization works in active partnership with persons served to:
  1. assume a service coordination role, as appropriate, when the need has been identified and no other organization has assumed that responsibility;
  2. ensure that they receive appropriate advocacy support;
  3. assist with access to the full array of services to which they are eligible; and
  4. mediate barriers to services within the service delivery system.  

 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 4.05

Service planning for persons with developmental disabilities addresses, as appropriate to the individual:
  1. health and safety issues;
  2. degree of supervision needed;
  3. independent living, social, and daily living skills;
  4. nutritional and dietary needs;
  5. leisure and vocational interests, aptitudes, and need for greater social inclusion;
  6. screening and treatment for co-occurring psychiatric disorders or substance use conditions;
  7. the need for assistive technology, auxiliary aids, and other special accommodations;
  8. positive behavior support planning;
  9. medication needs;
  10. issues related to adaptive, behavior, and cognitive functioning, including concrete and abstract reasoning;
  11. specialized supports such as physical, speech, and occupational therapy;
  12. ancillary services;
  13. end of life planning; and
  14. the need for hospice or palliative care.

 

IDDS 4.06

The worker and a supervisor, or a clinical, service, or peer team, review the case quarterly, or more frequently depending on the needs of persons served, to assess:
  1. service plan implementation;
  2. progress toward achieving service goals and desired outcomes; and
  3. the continuing appropriateness of the agreed upon service goals.
Interpretation: When experienced workers are conducting reviews of their own cases, the worker’s supervisor must review a sample of the worker’s evaluations as per the requirements of the standard.

 

IDDS 4.07

The worker and individual, and his or her family when appropriate:
  1. review progress toward achievement of agreed upon service goals; and
  2. sign revisions to service goals and plans.
2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 5: Social Inclusion and Community Participation

Persons with developmental disabilities and their families can access a broad spectrum of community services and supports designed to build independence and help them exercise their rights, privileges, and responsibilities as full members of the community.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Procedures for facilitating inclusion and community participation
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records

 

IDDS 5.01

The organization supports persons with developmental disabilities to establish meaningful social relationships, build and maintain natural support systems, exercise their rights and responsibilities, and participate in the life of their community by:
  1. identifying and pursuing the types of social roles, as well as family and other relationships, the individual wishes to pursue;
  2. providing opportunities for social and physical interaction with persons, in addition to service providers and recipients; and
  3. achieving an optimal level of community involvement and participation.

 

IDDS 5.02

Individuals with developmental disabilities receive services and supports that are tailored to their individual needs and help them fully interact with the community and achieve maximum independence in the least restrictive environment.
Examples: Services and supports can include:
  1. adult foster care or kinship care;
  2. education;
  3. employment, including supported employment;
  4. health and behavioral health services;
  5. housing services and supports;
  6. in-home support;
  7. recreation;
  8. volunteerism;
  9. religious and spiritual supports;
  10. mentoring services; and
  11. transportation.
Services and supports for children and youth with developmental disabilities can also include:
  1. after-school programs;
  2. education support; and
  3. mentoring.

 
Fundamental Practice

IDDS 5.03

Individuals with developmental disabilities receive appropriate support and education regarding sexuality and relationships, including:
  1. sexual development;
  2. safe and healthy relationships;
  3. family planning;
  4. prevention of STDs and HIV/AIDS; and
  5. prevention of sexual abuse and exploitation, including giving and receiving sexual consent.
2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 6: Assistive Technology

Assistive technology is available to help persons served make full use of the organization's services and live independently in the community.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Procedures for helping individuals access assistive technology
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records
  • Observe assistive technology

 

IDDS 6.01

The organization provides assistive technology, or helps the individual access resources, as needed, and the individual is:
  1. involved in the selection of specific technologies;
  2. afforded the opportunity to try the device prior to purchase or assignment; and
  3. trained on the use of specific assistive devices being provided.

 

IDDS 6.02

The organization works with community resources to help the individual and family:
  1. purchase or gain access to assistive technology, auxiliary aids, and other assistive devices; and
  2. make necessary physical adaptations to the person's home.
2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 7: Support Services for Family and Caregivers

Family and caregiver support services strengthen the family's ability to provide care, prevent unwanted and inappropriate out-of-home placements, and help maintain family unity.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Referral procedures
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records

 

IDDS 7.01

Information is available to help family and caregivers with their caretaking responsibilities.
Examples: Information can address the needs or interests of caregivers and can include topics such as early childhood development, behavior, home economics, work-life balance, and nutrition.

 

IDDS 7.02

The organization provides, or helps families and caregivers gain access to, a variety of community support services, including:
  1. behavioral support;
  2. case management;
  3. counseling;
  4. early intervention services;
  5. financial assistance;
  6. in-home support;
  7. public entitlements;
  8. respite services; and
  9. support groups.
2023 Edition

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Services (IDDS) 8: Case Closing and Aftercare

The organization works with the individual and family members, when appropriate, to plan for case closing and when possible to develop aftercare plans.
NA The organization provides a long-term permanent placement for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 

Currently viewing: CASE CLOSING AND AFTERCARE

Viewing: IDDS 8 - Case Closing and Aftercare

VIEW THE STANDARDS

1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,   
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • In a few instances, the organization terminated services inappropriately; or  
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent; or
  • A formal case closing evaluation is not consistently provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Services are frequently terminated inappropriately; or  
  • Aftercare planning is not initiated early enough to ensure orderly transitions; or
  • A formal case closing summary and assessment is seldom provided to the public authority per the requirements of the standard; or  
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing. 
Self-Study Evidence Site Visit Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Case closing procedures
  • Aftercare planning and follow-up procedures
No Site Visit Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant staff
    3. Persons served
  • Review case records

 

IDDS 8.01

Planning for case closing:
  1. is a clearly defined process that includes assignment of staff responsibility;
  2. begins at intake; and
  3. involves the worker, persons served and others, as appropriate to the needs and wishes of the individual.

 

IDDS 8.02

Upon case closing, the organization notifies any collaborating service providers, as appropriate. 

 

IDDS 8.03

If an individual has to leave the program unexpectedly, the organization makes every effort to identify other service options and link the person with appropriate services.
Interpretation: The organization must determine on a case-by-case basis its responsibility to continue providing services to persons whose third-party benefits are denied or have ended and who are in critical situations.

 

IDDS 8.04

When appropriate, the organization works with persons served and their family to:
  1. develop an aftercare plan, sufficiently in advance of case closing, that identifies short- and long-term needs and goals and facilitates the initiation or continuation of needed supports and services; or
  2. conduct a formal case closing evaluation, including an assessment of unmet need, when the organization has a contract with a public authority that does not include aftercare planning or follow-up.

 

IDDS 8.05

The organization follows up on the aftercare plan, as appropriate, when possible, and with the permission of persons served.
NA The organization has a contract with a public authority that prohibits or does not include aftercare planning or follow-up.
Examples: Reasons why follow-up may not be appropriate, include, but are not limited to, cases where the person’s participation is involuntary, or where there may be a risk to the individual such as in cases of domestic violence.
Copyright © 2024 Council on Accreditation