2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives Definition

Purpose

Community Change Initiatives mobilize the community for action, strengthen the capacity of residents and organizations to effect and sustain change, build and improve neighborhoods, and lay the groundwork for future progress.

Definition

Community Change Initiatives engage community stakeholders in a participatory process designed to improve an identified aspect of the community. Initiatives typically strive to develop local leadership, enhance social capital and personal networks, and strengthen the community's overall capacity to accomplish tasks and goals. Organizations seeking accreditation for Community Change Initiatives (CCI) work collaboratively with community stakeholders to facilitate this process.
Examples: The CCI Standards can accommodate both comprehensive and targeted community initiatives. For example, while one initiative might aim to promote broad-based change across all community dimensions, another might have a more targeted focus. Areas targeted may include, but are not limited to:  
  1. economic opportunity and security;
  2. physical development and infrastructure;  
  3. safety and security;  
  4. health and wellness;
  5. education;  
  6. civic participation;  
  7. cultural enrichment; and  
  8. social capital.

Note:While many of COA's Service Standards, as well as its Administration and Management Standards (see GOV 3), incorporate some of the principles that underlie community building, CCI is designed for organizations that play a more active and deliberate role in facilitating community change.


If an organization primarily builds and improves the community by providing services to individuals (e.g., by providing Workforce Development Services (WDS), or Case Management Services (CM)), the organization should complete that section of standards only. Organizations that provide services to individuals and play an active role in facilitating community change should complete service sections for both activities. For example, an organization that promotes community change by both providing case management and convening community stakeholders should complete both CM and CCI.


Note:Organizations that provide technical assistance to community change initiatives have the option to complete only: CCI 1, CCI 2, CCI 3, CCI 4, and CCI 6. Several of the practice standards within those core concepts also include NAs for technical assistance providers.


Note:Please see CCI Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.


Note:For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the CCI Crosswalk.


2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 1: Community-Centered Logic Model

The organization implements a program logic model that describes how resources and program activities will support the achievement of positive outcomes. 

NotePlease see the Logic Model Template for additional guidance on this standard.  
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2

Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  

  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one outcome has been identified for all of its programs.
3

Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,

  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs.
4

Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,

  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs.

 

CCI 1.01

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies: 

  1. needs the program will address; 
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs); 
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results; 
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered); 
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in the community); and 
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system. 

Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA Accreditation’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models. 

 

Examples:Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 

  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; and 
  2. the best available evidence of service effectiveness. 

 

CCI 1.02

The logic model identifies at least two outcomes appropriate to the program or service population. 

Interpretation: Outcomes data should be disaggregated to identify patterns of disparity or inequity that can be masked by aggregate data reporting. See PQI 5.02 for more information on disaggregating data to track and monitor identified outcomes. 

2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to build community capacity and promote community change.
Interpretation: Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.

Interpretation: Within the context of this standard, personnel may include paid employees or volunteers.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Training curricula
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 

CCI 2.01

Personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. engaging and building trusting relationships with community members;
  2. communicating effectively with relevant stakeholders;
  3. adapting to changing situations and environments;
  4. assessing community characteristics, assets, needs, and priorities;
  5. capitalizing on assets and strengths within a community;
  6. developing and monitoring implementation of results-oriented community plans;
  7. leading and facilitating meetings and discussions;
  8. managing groups and resolving conflicts;
  9. building coalitions among community residents, associations, and institutions;
  10. developing networks with groups outside the community that can advance the initiative;
  11. understanding and working within relevant financial and administrative infrastructures;
  12. understanding and implementing projects related to the focus and priorities of the initiative (e.g., improving infrastructure, preventing substance use, promoting public safety, etc.);
  13. engaging in community work without maintaining a high profile or dominating the initiative’s public presence; and
  14. promoting the sustainability of results.

 

CCI 2.02

Personnel include members of the community who:
  1. are knowledgeable about community dynamics; and
  2. demonstrate a long-term commitment to the community and the initiative’s goals.

 

CCI 2.03

Employee workloads support the achievement of community outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker including the level of supervision needed; and
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities.
2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 3: Community Engagement

The organization engages a diverse group of community stakeholders to plan and carry out initiatives that improve the community.

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1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • List of stakeholders
  • Procedures for communicating with stakeholders
  • Procedures for collecting stakeholder feedback
  • Procedures for group decision making and dispute resolution
  • Evidence of collaboration with stakeholders from the previous six months (i.e., meeting notices, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, correspondence, documentation of decisions)
  • Copies of outreach and informational materials, including reports on progress, provided to various stakeholder groups over the previous 6 months
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Stakeholders
  • Observe community meetings, if possible

 

CCI 3.01

On an ongoing basis the organization helps the initiative identify and engage a group of stakeholders that represent many segments of the community including organizations, institutions, and residents who reflect the diversity of the community, on an ongoing basis.
Examples: Relevant organizations and institutions can include, but are not limited to: civic associations, tenant associations, neighborhood centers, parks and recreation services, schools and colleges, faith-based institutions and associations, health and social services agencies, libraries, cultural institutions, youth development or afterschool programs, for-profit businesses, public officials and policymakers, funders, and the media.

 

CCI 3.02

The organization provides opportunities for community stakeholders to be involved in all aspects of the initiative by:
  1. providing timely notification of meetings;
  2. documenting all important decisions in writing;
  3. developing procedures for communicating with community stakeholders about the initiative and its activities;
  4. regularly reporting to the community on the initiative’s status, progress, and outcomes; and
  5. developing procedures for community stakeholders to provide regular feedback about the initiative and the organization’s role in the initiative.
Interpretation: In the event that a key stakeholder chooses not to participate, the organization must document efforts to encourage participation and show that the stakeholder was not intentionally excluded.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
Examples: Strategies and techniques for facilitating communication with stakeholders include, but are not limited to: community meetings and public forums, newsletters, news releases, resident information brokers and organizing coordinators, neighborhood networks, house parties, festivals; parades, and other special events.

 

CCI 3.03

The organization facilitates a collaborative working arrangement by:
  1. bringing community stakeholders together as peers and equals;
  2. ensuring that no stakeholder, including the organization itself, dominates the initiative;
  3. demonstrating tolerance, understanding, and respect for both stakeholders and the community as a whole;
  4. facilitating the development of trust and respect among community stakeholders;
  5. following fair and clearly-understood procedures for decision-making and dispute resolution; and
  6. addressing and managing any conflicts that arise.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 4: Developing Stakeholders' Capacities and Connections

Community stakeholders are provided with opportunities to develop the skills and connections they need to participate in the initiative and sustain positive changes in their community.
Examples: Different techniques may be used to help stakeholders develop skills and cultivate networks. Examples of potential strategies include, but are not limited to: mentoring, coaching, modeling, workshops, conferences, and technical assistance provided by outside experts. Capacity-building opportunities may be provided to a group of stakeholders or they may occur one-on-one as an individual prepares to take on a specific task or role. They may also be provided directly by the organization or through referral. Given the nature of community building initiatives and the extent to which stakeholders are to be involved in the process, stakeholders’ capacities and connections will also be strengthened simply through their participation in the initiative.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Procedures for connecting stakeholders to other organizations, agencies, or parties
  • Training curricula and/or other relevant materials that demonstrate capacity-building opportunities
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Stakeholders
  • Observetrainings or other capacity-building opportunities, if possible

 

CCI 4.01

Individuals are provided with opportunities to:
  1. develop relevant skills;
  2. cultivate positive connections and social networks with other community residents;
  3. connect with organizations and institutions in the community; and
  4. mobilize for action.
Examples: Relevant skills may include, but are not limited to: organizing, leadership, problem-solving, decision-making, and group facilitation.

 

CCI 4.02

Community organizations and institutions are provided with opportunities to develop and strengthen:
  1. their internal capacities, including their leadership and governance; and
  2. their networks and alliances with other community organizations and institutions.

 

CCI 4.03

The organization helps community residents, organizations, institutions, and other stakeholders connect with people, resources, and opportunities outside of their community.
Examples: Establishing relationships with state and local government representatives is one way the organization can use ties outside the community to strengthen its community change initiatives.
2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 5: Community Assessment

An assessment is conducted in partnership with relevant stakeholders to identify the community's characteristics, assets, needs, and priorities.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
  • Copy of most recent community assessment(s)
  • Evidence of collaboration with stakeholders (i.e., meeting notices, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, correspondence, documentation of decisions)
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Stakeholders

 

CCI 5.01

A culturally and linguistically responsive assessment is conducted using planned, diverse strategies to systematically identify and analyze the community’s: 
  1. demographics and characteristics;
  2. protective factors, including the assets, skills, capacities, and resources of its residents, organizations, and institutions; and 
  3. needs, issues, and concerns.
Interpretation: Evidence-based assessment strategies should be used whenever possible.

Interpretation: COA recognizes that, in some cases, the organization might not conduct the community assessment directly and instead might utilize the results of an assessment already conducted by another party. For example, if the state department of health conducted an assessment which revealed that a certain problem existed in the community, the initiative might have been launched in response to that identified need. When this is the case, the organization is not expected to complete another community assessment. However, it should be prepared to provide evidence of the assessment it draws upon in order to demonstrate that the initiative has been built based on real data.

Regardless of who conducts the community assessment, the information should be up-to-date, ideally collected within the last three years.
Examples: A variety of strategies may be used to gather this information. Strategies may include, but are not limited to: surveys; one-on-one interviews; focus groups; reviews of existing demographic information, research, and literature, including environmental scans and needs assessments; informal outreach through door-to-door canvassing or visits to community centers and other gathering places; media analysis; and power mapping.

Examples: Community demographics and characteristics can include things like population statistics, age, marital status, household size, racial and ethnic background, language spoken, educational levels, employment rates, income, and health statistics.

 

CCI 5.02

The organization works with relevant stakeholders to set the initiative’s priorities based on the findings of the assessment and a shared vision for the community.
Interpretation: In some cases an initiative’s primary priority may have been established in response to an already-identified concern. However, the organization should still work with community stakeholders to get their input about the pre-determined priorities, and stakeholders should be involved in establishing future priorities whenever possible.
2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 6: Planning and Monitoring Progress

The organization works with stakeholders to develop and monitor a results-oriented plan that is based on the findings of the community assessment, and guides the initiative’s activities and projects.
Interpretation: Rather than following a linear path, planning and action often occur simultaneously and interactively throughout the course of an initiative. Accordingly, although planning is an essential part of the improvement process, initial planning need not be exhaustive. Instead of striving to develop an all-encompassing plan before taking any action, some organizations may launch some tangible activities with visible benefits early in the initiative in order to build momentum, keep stakeholders motivated, and increase the likelihood of success.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
  • Planning and monitoring procedures
  • Copy of plan(s)
  • Evidence of collaboration with stakeholders from the previous six months (i.e., meeting notices, meeting agendas, meeting minutes, correspondence, documentation of decisions)
  • Documentation that demonstrates implementation of projects and activities (e.g., letters confirming projects and activities)

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Stakeholders
  • Observe community meetings, if possible
  • Observe community activities and projects, if possible

 

CCI 6.01

The organization actively involves stakeholders in developing a plan for community change that is:
  1. based on the community assessment;
  2. results-oriented;
  3. tailored to local conditions and priorities; and
  4. respectful of diversity and difference.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.

 

CCI 6.02

The plan addresses:
  1. priorities and areas of focus;
  2. the community’s current readiness to take action on a particular issue;
  3. measurable goals and desired outcomes;
  4. strategies for achieving goals and desired outcomes;
  5. resources and skills needed to implement strategies and activities;
  6. reasonable timeframes for implementing activities and achieving goals;
  7. the roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders;
  8. measures for tracking and evaluating progress; and
  9. strategies for promoting the long-term sustainability of the initiative and its achievements.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
Examples: Factors affecting a community’s readiness to take action on a particular issue can include the community’s resources, priorities, and motivation to act.

 

CCI 6.03

The organization coordinates with other local groups to ensure there is no duplication of effort or competing priorities.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.

 

CCI 6.04

The organization works with relevant stakeholders to implement activities and projects that:
  1. address the priorities and goals specified in the plan; 
  2. build or improve some aspect of the community; and
  3. allow stakeholders to collaborate in a way that builds social and human capital.

 

CCI 6.05

The organization periodically reevaluates the implementation and ongoing appropriateness of the established plan, including: 
  1. assessing the degree to which community stakeholders have become engaged in the initiative;
  2. ensuring that the organization and relevant community stakeholders are fulfilling their identified responsibilities as outlined in the plan; 
  3. responding to any issues that arise or circumstances that change during the course of the initiative; 
  4. conducting data-driven evaluation of progress towards goals including identifying areas of success and areas in need of additional effort; 
  5. evaluating whether the priorities and goals included in the plan are still applicable and appropriate; 
  6. making any adjustments or modifications needed to achieve goals; and 
  7. expanding the plan to address additional community priorities, if applicable and appropriate.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
2023 Edition

Community Change Initiatives (CCI) 7: Sustaining Progress

The organization works with relevant stakeholders to ensure the initiative and its achievements will be sustainable over time.
NA The organization only provides technical assistance to community change initiatives.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study Evidence On-Site Evidence On-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Leadership training curricula, schedules of events, or other evidence of leadership development efforts in the community for the previous six months
  • Copies of agreements with stakeholders, portions of relevant plans, or other documentation outlining steps for transitioning primary responsibility for the initiative's activities to community stakeholders
  • Copies of informational materials provided to the community on achievements and lessons learned for the previous six months

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Stakeholders

 

CCI 7.01

The organization works with relevant stakeholders to develop, cultivate, and sustain current and future community leadership through training, mentoring, and experiential development opportunities.

 

CCI 7.02

The organization promotes increased community responsibility for sustaining positive outcomes by: 
  1. identifying the activities that will sustain results over time and responsible parties;
  2. fostering continued engagement of relevant stakeholders; and 
  3. determining its role in the future of the initiative.
Interpretation: Organizations typically take a less active role once an initiative is sufficiently organized to ensure sustained results. However, the extent to which an initiative can operate with autonomy may vary given the circumstances that prompted its development. For example, some funding sources may mandate a certain level of onging management and involvement by the lead organization (i.e. the organization seeking COA accreditation).

 

CCI 7.03

The organization promotes ongoing engagement of internal and external stakeholders and the community by: 
  1. publicizing the initiative's achievements and lessons learned; and
  2. celebrating achievements.
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