CA-EES Standard. Generated 6/28/2022. ©2022 Council on Accreditation.
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement Definition

Purpose

Experiential Education provides safe, activity-based opportunities for learning and reflection that support the achievement of identified program outcomes. 

Definition

The Experiential Education Supplement applies when an organization conducts experiential activities such as hiking, ropes courses, or horseback riding as part of any COA accredited service. Activities are designed to support the achievement of treatment or service objectives through direct experience and focused reflection.
Note: Supplemental, experiential activities that are accredited by the Association for Experiential Education (AEE) or American Camp Association (ACA) are exempt from this section. 

Note: Please see EES Activities Table for additional guidance on this standard. 

Note: Please see CA-EES Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.

Note: For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the EES Crosswalk.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 1: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of participants.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • A list of activity personnel and their credentials
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Review personnel files

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 1.01

Individuals who assume responsibility for supervision of participants in the field are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. navigating and operating in a given terrain;
  2. using materials and equipment employed in the field;
  3. interpreting and responding to changes in weather and environmental conditions;
  4. improvising solutions to unanticipated problems and emergencies in the field such as environmental hazards, harmful plants or animals, and extreme weather conditions; and
  5. conducting medical evacuation, when applicable.
NA The organization does not conduct trips or activities away from the program site. 

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 1.02

Personnel are supervised by fully trained individuals until they have completed training, and do not assume sole responsibility for participants engaged in high-risk activities. 

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 1.03

Before assignment as a group leader or assistant, the organization provides and documents in the personnel record:
  1. supervised field experiences;
  2. competency testing; and
  3. certification in the area of assigned responsibility, when certification is available.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 1.04

Personnel must receive training at least every two years in first-aid and age-appropriate CPR that includes an in-person, hands-on CPR skills assessment conducted by a certified CPR instructor before assuming primary responsibility for a group. 
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 2: Screening

The organization evaluates children and youth for their ability to participate in athletic activities and obtains written, signed permission slips from parents or legal guardians.

Interpretation

The organization should obtain a signed document from a qualified medical professional stating that the participant is physically capable of participating, whenever parents or legal guardians are unreachable, or if children and youth are participating in strenuous athletic activities.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for obtaining clearance to participate in athletic activities
No On-Site Evidence
  • Review case records
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 3: Program Activities

Program activities are designed to meet individual needs, build on strengths, develop skills, and promote learning through experience.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for tailoring activities to the abilities of participants
  • Policy on coercion/force
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Individuals or families served
  • Review case records
  • Observe group activities, if possible

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 3.01

The organization tailors activities to the abilities of participants by:
  1. planning, adjusting, and graduating experiences to the level of difficulty appropriate for the skill levels and capacities of participants;
  2. teaching needed skills and techniques progressively;
  3. providing appropriate support and supervision for less skilled participants; and
  4. pacing group activities according to the capacities of the least able or fit member of the group.

 

CA-EES 3.02

The organization prohibits:
  1. the use of coercion or force to induce any participant to engage in a specific adventure-based activity; and
  2. deliberately limitating reasonable options or alternatives to participation.

Interpretation

Organizations are not required to obtain pro-formal verbal agreements for each activity and sub-activity, but must take any strong objections from participants seriously and examine all implications, such as illness or skill level, and offer encouragement to participate, when needed. Organizations must clearly specify in their informed consent procedures if (1) the program has a “challenge by choice” philosophy; (2) whether participants will be required to complete all or most elements of the experience; or (3) if alternative activities can be used to accomplish the same goals to ensure that the person granting informed consent understands in advance this feature of the program.

 

CA-EES 3.03

Personnel help participants learn from their experiences and integrate acquired skills into practice by engaging participants through formal and informal discussions. 

Interpretation

Discussions focused on evaluating individual client needs should be recorded in the case record. Discussions regarding group dynamics and environmental concerns should be recorded in a guide or therapist log.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 4: Safety and Risk Management

The organization ensures safe practice through advanced planning, safety procedures, and personnel and participant training.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Safety procedures
  • The table of contents for participant safety training curricula
  • Drug and alcohol policy
  • Program or activity discharge policy
  • Sample of completed activity safety manuals, evacuation plans, or other safety documentation from past trips
  • Contracts, including safety expectations, with any outside transportation providers
  • Participant safety training curricula
  • Sample of documentation tracking participant completion of required safety training for three trips
  • Procedures for maintaining medication and emergency and first aid supplies
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.01

When conducting offsite activities, the trip or activity plan includes:
  1. an itinerary maintained at the organization’s central location;
  2. weather conditions under which evacuation may be warranted;
  3. evacuation and search and rescue procedures for trips or activities in remote areas;
  4. detailed information regarding contact with the program director, or a designee, and rangers when appropriate;
  5. means of contacting rescue resources, medical facilities, and law enforcement; and
  6. any public or private entity notified of the itinerary.
NA The organization does not conduct trips or activities away from the program site.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.02

Safety procedures include:
  1. use of a written safety manual or equivalent safety plan for each type of activity offered;
  2. completion of a safety or risk-management plan before each activity that contains safety preparations and other emergency planning information;
  3. providing activity leaders with funds or other means for obtaining emergency resources during trips or programs held off-site;
  4. providing appropriate equipment for emergency communication links from field personnel to outside medical and other resources for trips or activities in remote areas;
  5. filing reports for accidents or incidents in which personnel or participants were injured or at risk;
  6. a mechanism for making participants’ relevant health and medical information available to staff conducting activities including procedures for bringing such information into the field when applicable; and
  7. notifying the program director or designee if emergency procedures are invoked or an unanticipated problem or incident occurs.

Interpretation

Elements c and d will not apply when activities are always conducted at the program site.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.03

Safety procedures related to missing persons address:
  1. search and rescue;
  2. public safety agency involvement, when necessary; and
  3. notification of all relevant personnel and parents/legal guardians when applicable.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.04

An organization that provides transportation in agency-owned vehicles, or in vehicles owned by personnel or contractors, has safety procedures that require:
  1. access to emergency roadside repair tools, spare tires, and parts;
  2. pre-trip vehicle checks;
  3. advance planning for supervision of youth during scheduled stops; and
  4. advance planning for appropriate breaks and rest stops, with a full day of rest scheduled following four consecutive days of vehicular travel.
NA The organization does not provide transportation directly or by contract.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.05

The organization trains all participants in planned trips or adventure-based activities about the prevention of relevant risks including:
  1. sunstroke, sunburn, hyperthermia, dehydration, frostbite, and snow blindness as appropriate to the type of activity and weather conditions;
  2. dangerous plants, animals, situations, and other hazards that may be associated with particular activities or locations; and
  3. allergic and anaphylactic reactions.

Interpretation

Participants only need to be trained on the prevention of risks associated with the type of trip or activities being conducted. For example, training on frostbite, snow blindness, or sunburn would not be needed for experiential activities conducted indoors.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.06

First aid, emergency response kits and supplies, and medications needed by participants are available and under the control of the activity leader or other responsible personnel at all times.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.07

Policy prohibits participants and personnel from using alcohol or other drugs while engaging in organization-sponsored activities.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 4.08

Participants may be discharged from a specific activity if:
  1. their behaviour or other problems make continuation unsafe or ineffective; or
  2. evacuation from remote locations is deemed necessary for health or mental health reasons.

Interpretation

Element b will not apply when activities are not conducted in remote locations.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 5: Physical Environment

The organization’s activities provide for land or facility use that is safe, hygienic, and respectful of the physical environment.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Environmental protection procedures
  • Health and safety procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Individuals or families served

 

CA-EES 5.01

Outdoor activities are conducted in a manner that is respectful of the environment and minimizes harmful effects. 

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 5.02

To ensure the health and safety of participants and personnel, the organization provides for:
  1. a safe, hygienic environment;
  2. adequate shelter from the elements;
  3. nutritious food;
  4. clothing and equipment appropriate for the activities and environment;
  5. infection control measures related to wilderness living including safe drinking water, toileting, food, and response to illness; and
  6. personal hygiene measures that ensure privacy.

Interpretation

Elements (e) and (f) do not apply if the organization does not conduct trips or activities away from the program site.  
Examples: Personal hygiene includes bathing, oral health, toileting, and feminine hygiene.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 6: Equipment Safety

The organization ensures that all equipment is appropriate and properly maintained.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for maintaining equipment
  • Policy on field testing equipment
  • Documentation of equipment inspections and maintenance for the past 12 months
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Relevant personnel
  • Observe equipment

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 6.01

All sports and outdoor equipment, including equipment that belongs to participants or personnel, meets national safety standards.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 6.02

Equipment maintenance procedures include:
  1. pre- and post-activity equipment inspections, routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and repair;
  2. rehabilitation or removal of substandard equipment; and
  3. documentation of inspections and maintenance.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 6.03

Field testing materials or equipment that are new on the market in order to provide feedback to the manufacturer is prohibited while conducting service activities.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 7: Activity Technical and Safety Requirements

The organization considers safety and technical requirements, competence of leaders, and the abilities of participants when engaging in potentially demanding or high risk activities.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for activity preparation, including group safety and skill level
  • Procedures regarding use of protective gear and equipment
  • Fire safety procedures
  • Fire safety training curricula
  • Authoritative information regarding compliance with accepted standards for all climbing equipment owned or used by the organization
  • Credentials of individuals responsible for supervising climbing equipment
  • Climbing equipment inspection and safety reports for the past 12 months
  • Proof of accreditation, licensure, or certification appropriate for high-risk activities
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Individuals and families served
  • Review personnel files

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.01

Before initiation of an activity, the organization:                                  
  1. orients personnel to the terrain, sites, or waterways that will be used;
  2. verifies that personnel have direct experience with, and up-to-date information about, the conditions that may be encountered; and
  3. provides participants with complete information about geographic boundaries for the activity, rendezvous times and places, and emergency procedures.
NA The organization does not conduct trips or activities away from the program site.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.02

The organization evaluates potentially demanding activities for level of difficulty and undertakes only those within the competence of the leaders and the abilities of participants.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.03

When the activity involves travel or movement, participants receive instruction in pacing, fluid intake, clothing and footwear, equipment, and possible hazards. 
NA The organization does not conduct activities that involve travel or movement.
Examples: Relevant activities may include hiking, running, climbing, canoeing, bicycle touring, or similar pursuits.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.04

Participants and personnel use protective gear and equipment when appropriate, including:
  1. personal flotation devices approved by Transport Canada for water activities;
  2. location devices and reflectors for dusk and night activities;
  3. helmets for biking, climbing, caving, or other appropriate activities; and
  4. other protective gear and equipment, as appropriate to the activity to be undertaken.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.05

As applicable to the activity being conducted, the organization maintains clear guidelines and trains personnel and participants on safely building and extinguishing fires.
NA The organization does not conduct activities that involve building and extinguishing fires.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.06

Ropes courses, alpine or climbing towers, and artificial wall climbing activities meet the following requirements:
  1. the facilities and equipment used have been constructed by recognized experts in the field;
  2. personnel have been trained by recognized experts in the field and have a working knowledge of ropes course and climbing equipment elements, technology, construction, usage, and inspection; and
  3. appropriate inspection and safety procedures have been fully implemented.
NA The organization does not operate the specified activities or program components.
Note: COA does not approve, certify, or accredit ropes courses, alpine or climbing towers, or artificial wall climbing programs. The organization must seek independent review by recognized experts for that purpose.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 7.07

Organizations that offer high-risk activities use certified instructors and maintain proof of accreditation, licensure, or certification with a nationally recognized authority for the activity being conducted.
NA The organization does not offer any high-risk activities.
Examples: High-risk activities can include:
  1. white water rafting, kayaking, or canoeing;
  2. snow and ice climbing or glacier travel;
  3. mountaineering, bouldering, and rock climbing;
  4. top rope climbing and rappelling;
  5. caving;
  6. river crossing;
  7. solo expeditions;
  8. activities involving flying, hang gliding, gliding, and parachuting; and
  9. other high-risk activities.
 
2022 Edition

Experiential Education Supplement (CA-EES) 8: Care and Supervision

Participants are closely supervised, and group size is adjusted to promote safety and limit liability and risk.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for establishing and adjusting personnel/participant ratios
  • Procedures for staffing activities
  • Coverage schedules for a recent six month period that includes personnel/participant ratios and group sizes
  • Samples of coverage and supervision plans for off-site groups in the previous six months
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Individuals and families served

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 8.01

Group size and personnel to participant ratios are adjusted according to:
  1. the nature of the activity;
  2. the level of the activity’s difficulty, risk, and distance from the organization’s central location;
  3. the skill and experience of personnel; and
  4. the ages, abilities, developmental level, and needs of participants.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 8.02

Group activities are supervised by:
  1. at least two group leaders or instructors; and
  2. additional staff when known risks are present.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 8.03

For solo activities, a group leader or instructor:
  1. is responsible for the safety of that participant or group;
  2. maintains sight or sound contact 24 hours a day, or has a plan for making contact in the event of urgent or emergent situations; and
  3. adjusts the degree of supervision to the participant’s ability, the terrain, and environmental conditions.
NA The organization does not conduct solo activities.

 
Fundamental Practice

CA-EES 8.04

A coverage and supervision plan is developed for off-site groups that:
  1. indicates the reporting relationships and delegation of authority; and
  2. gives decision-making authority to a person qualified by a combination of education, field experience, technical and safety expertise, and maturity.
NA The organization does not conduct off-site trips or activities.
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