CA-WDS Standard. Generated 7/02/2022. ©2022 Council on Accreditation.
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services Definition

Purpose

Job seekers who receive workforce development, support, and financial asset building services achieve increased economic self-sufficiency.

Definition

Workforce Development and Support Services are community-based services that provide information and referral; educational opportunities; job training, placement, and follow-up; and financial asset building services to facilitate personal job acquisition and economic mobility. Workforce development programs must adopt a dual-customer approach by providing services that address the needs of both employers and job seekers.
Examples: Job seekers receiving workforce development services can include, but are not limited to, any of the following populations:
  1. individuals receiving public assistance;
  2. adolescents and adults without a high school diploma;
  3. adolescents and adults involved with the justice system;
  4. migrant and seasonal workers;
  5. resettled immigrants and refugees;
  6. older adults returning to the workforce after retirement;
  7. dislocated or low-wage incumbent workers; and
  8. veterans of the military looking for civilian work.
Note: Please see the CA-WDS Reference List for the research that informed the development of these standards.

Note: For information about changes made in the 2020 Edition, please see the WDS Crosswalk.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 1: Person-Centered Logic Model

A program logic model, or equivalent framework, identifies:
  1. needs the program will address;
  2. available human, financial, organizational, and community resources (i.e. inputs);
  3. program activities intended to bring about desired results;
  4. program outputs (i.e. the size and scope of services delivered); 
  5. desired outcomes (i.e. the changes you expect to see in service recipients); and
  6. expected long-term impact on the organization, community, and/or system.
Examples: Please see the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Logic Model Development Guide and COA’s PQI Tool Kit for more information on developing and using program logic models.

Examples: Information that may be used to inform the development of the program logic model includes, but is not limited to: 
  1. needs assessments and periodic reassessments; and
  2. the best available evidence of service effectiveness.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.

Logic models have been implemented for all programs and the organization has identified at least two outcomes for all its programs.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • Logic models need improvement or clarification; or
  • Logic models are still under development for some of its programs, but are completed for all high-risk programs such as protective services, foster care, residential treatment, etc.; or
  • At least one client outcome has been identified for all of its programs; or
  • All but a few staff have been trained on use of therapeutic interventions and training is scheduled for the rest; or
  • With few exceptions the policy on prohibited interventions is understood by staff, or the written policy needs minor clarification.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Logic models need significant improvement; or
  • Logic models are still under development for a majority of programs; or
  • A logic model has not been developed for one or more high-risk programs; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for one or more programs; or
  • Several staff have not been trained on the use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • There are gaps in monitoring of therapeutic interventions, as required; or
  • There is no process for identifying risks associated with use of therapeutic interventions; or
  • Policy on prohibited interventions does not include at least one of the required elements.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Logic models have not been developed or implemented; or
  • Outcomes have not been identified for any programs; or
  • There is no written policy or procedures for the use of therapeutic interventions; or 
  • Procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation on therapeutic interventions is routinely incomplete and/or missing; or
  • There is evidence that clients have been harmed by inappropriate or unmonitored use of therapeutic interventions.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • See program description completed during intake
  • Program logic model that includes a list of outcomes being measured
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 2: Personnel

Program personnel have the competency and support needed to provide services and meet the needs of job seekers.

Interpretation

Competency can be demonstrated through education, training, or experience. Support can be provided through supervision or other learning activities to improve understanding or skill development in specific areas.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,  
  • With some exceptions, staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc., but the integrity of the service is not compromised; or
  • Supervisors provide additional support and oversight, as needed, to the few staff without the listed qualifications; or 
  • Most staff who do not meet educational requirements are seeking to obtain them; or 
  • With few exceptions, staff have received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training curricula are not fully developed or lack depth; or
  • Training documentation is consistently maintained and kept up-to-date with some exceptions; or
  • A substantial number of supervisors meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization provides training and/or consultation to improve competencies when needed; or
  • With few exceptions, caseload sizes are consistently maintained as required by the standards or as required by internal policy when caseload has not been set by a standard; or
  • Workloads are such that staff can effectively accomplish their assigned tasks and provide quality services and are adjusted as necessary; or
  • Specialized services are obtained as required by the standards.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.  Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • A significant number of staff (direct service providers, supervisors, and program managers) do not possess the required qualifications, including education, experience, training, skills, temperament, etc.; and as a result, the integrity of the service may be compromised; or
  • Job descriptions typically do not reflect the requirements of the standards, and/or hiring practices do not document efforts to hire staff with required qualifications when vacancies occur; or 
  • Supervisors do not typically provide additional support and oversight to staff without the listed qualifications; or
  • A significant number of staff have not received required training, including applicable specialized training; or
  • Training documentation is poorly maintained; or
  • A significant number of supervisors do not meet the requirements of the standard, and the organization makes little effort to provide training and/or consultation to improve competencies; or
  • There are numerous instances where caseload sizes exceed the standards' requirements or the requirements of internal policy when a caseload size is not set by the standard; or
  • Workloads are excessive, and the integrity of the service may be compromised; or 
  • Specialized staff are typically not retained as required and/or many do not possess the required qualifications; or
  • Specialized services are infrequently obtained as required by the standards.
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards.
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • List of program personnel that includes:
    • Title
    • Name
    • Employee, volunteer, or independent contractor
    • Degree or other qualifications
    • Time in current position
  • See organizational chart submitted during application
  • Table of contents of training curricula
  • Procedures or other documentation relevant to continuity of care and case assignment
  • Sample job descriptions from across relevant job categories
  • Coverage schedule for previous six months documenting availability of supervisors for consultation at all times services are provided
  • Documentation tracking staff completion of required trainings and/or competencies
  • Training curricula
  • Caseload size requirements set by policy, regulation, or contract, when applicable
  • Documentation of current caseload size per worker, when applicable
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
  • Reviewpersonnel files

 

CA-WDS 2.01

Supervisors qualified by a bachelor’s degree, or equivalent training and experience, are available to provide case consultation at all times services are provided.

 

CA-WDS 2.02

All direct service personnel are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. identifying support networks of family, friends, and community resources;
  2. screening topics relevant to the identified service population;
  3. adult learning principles and the diversity of workforce development approaches;
  4. working with youth to explore career opportunities, when applicable; and
  5. common barriers to employment.

 

CA-WDS 2.03

Direct service personnel who provide financial asset-building services are trained on, or demonstrate competency in:
  1. counselling individuals on any local or provincial asset limitation regulations and their implications for continued receipt of public assistance;
  2. identifying local programs that provide assistance and incentives for financial asset building; and
  3. overcoming obstacles to asset building for immigrants, refugees, and migrant or seasonal workers, including predatory lending.
NA The organization does not provide financial asset-building services.
Examples: Obstacles to asset building for immigrants, refugees, and migrant or seasonal workers can include a lack of appropriate documentation or identification; difficulty understanding local banking, mortgage, and business systems; and prejudice among employers, local businesses, and citizens.

 

CA-WDS 2.04

The organization minimizes the number of workers assigned to job seekers over the course of their contact with the organization by:
  1. assigning a worker at intake or early in the contact; and
  2. avoiding the arbitrary or indiscriminate reassignment of direct service personnel.

 

CA-WDS 2.05

Employee workloads support the achievement of client outcomes and are regularly reviewed.
Examples: Factors that may be considered when determining employee workloads include, but are not limited to:
  1. the qualifications, competencies, and experience of the worker including level of supervision needed;
  2. the work and time required to accomplish assigned tasks and job responsibilities; and
  3. service volume, accounting for assessed level of needs of persons served.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 3: Community Partnerships

The organization creates partnerships with local employers, community service providers, and educational institutions to provide workforce development services that are appropriate, accessible, coordinated, and comprehensive.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Documentation of regular contact and collaboration with relevant systems, providers, and employers from the previous six months
  • Community resource and referral list including community services and potential employers
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Community partners/employers

 

CA-WDS 3.01

Program managers and supervisors facilitate regular contact and collaboration with relevant systems and government agencies including, but not limited to:
  1. the criminal and youth justice systems;
  2. health and mental health care providers;
  3. educational institutions; and
  4. the local housing authority.
Examples: Methods that the organization may use to facilitate regular contact among its community partners include:
  1. virtual networking;
  2. email/phone; 
  3. co-location;
  4. satellite locations or roving vans; and
  5. referral or formal contracting.

 

CA-WDS 3.02

The organization develops and maintains a working relationship with employers in the community identified as being in need of trained workers and able to offer opportunities for career advancement.

 

CA-WDS 3.03

The organization maintains a comprehensive list of community service providers and potential employers that is accessible to direct service personnel.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 4: Assessment-Based Employment Planning and Monitoring

Each job seeker participates in the development and ongoing review of an assessment-based employment plan.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • In a few rare instances, urgent needs were not prioritized; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Culturally responsive assessments are the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Urgent needs are often not prioritized; or 
  • Services are frequently not initiated in a timely manner; or
  • Applicants are not receiving referrals, as appropriate; or 
  • Assessment and reassessment timeframes are often missed; or
  • Assessment are sometimes not sufficiently individualized; 
  • Culturally responsive assessments are not the norm, and this is not being addressed in supervision or training; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent; or
  • Intake or assessment is done by another organization or referral source and no documentation and/or summary of required information is present in case record. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • There are no written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.  
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Assessment procedures
  • Copy of assessment tool(s)
  • Employment planning and monitoring procedures
No On-Site Evidence
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Job seekers
  • Review case records

 

CA-WDS 4.01

Job seekers participate in an assessment that is:
  1. individualized;
  2. culturally and linguistically responsive; and
  3. completed within established timeframes.

 

CA-WDS 4.02

Assessments identify the job seeker’s:
  1. previous formal and informal work experience;
  2. relevant life experience;
  3. interests, aptitudes, and employment goals;
  4. training and educational needs;
  5. strengths and coping strategies;
  6. informal support networks; and
  7. barriers to employment and job retention.

 

CA-WDS 4.03

The organization works with the job seeker to develop and regularly review an assessment-based employment plan that includes: 
  1. agreed upon goals, desired outcomes, and timeframes for achieving them;
  2. services and supports to be provided, and by whom;
  3. the individual’s signature; and
  4. revisions to service goals and plans when needed.

 

CA-WDS 4.04

The organization works in active partnership with job seekers to: 
  1. assume a service coordination role, as appropriate, when the need has been identified and no other organization has assumed that responsibility;
  2. ensure that they receive appropriate advocacy support;
  3. assist with access to the full array of services to which they are eligible; and
  4. mediate barriers to services within the service delivery system.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 5: Training and Personal Development Services

The organization works with community employers to provide job seekers with training programs and other personal development opportunities that help individuals acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve gainful employment and job mobility.
NA The organization does not provide training and personal development services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for reviewing training courses every two years
  • Table of contents for job readiness training curricula
  • Policy on serving individuals with disabilities
  • Job readiness training curricula
  • Course descriptions for each training course offered in the previous six months
  • Training schedules for the previous six months
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Job seekers
    4. Employers
  • Review case records

 

CA-WDS 5.01

The organization reviews its training courses every two years with input from local business, and makes modifications as necessary, to ensure that training programs:
  1. meet the needs of local employers; and
  2. are appropriate to the skill level of local job seekers.

 

CA-WDS 5.02

Job readiness training addresses:
  1. workplace practices;
  2. workforce diversity;
  3. anger management and conflict resolution;
  4. working effectively with others;
  5. stress and time management;
  6. computer literacy; and
  7. financial literacy.

 

CA-WDS 5.03

Each training course has a written course description including the curriculum, location, and meeting time of training sessions.

 

CA-WDS 5.04

Training schedules are flexible and include evening hours and, when possible, distance learning opportunities and individually paced instruction.
Examples: Individually paced instruction is typically offered through a computer-based program that allows students to skip quickly over material they are familiar with or move slowly through material that is more difficult. It is often more effective to provide this in a classroom-style setting where a teacher or trainer is available if the student has questions.

 

CA-WDS 5.05

Based on their assessed needs and individualized employment plan, job seekers have access to a combination of educational programs that include:
  1. degree or certificate programs;
  2. ESL courses; and
  3. GED or high school courses.

 

CA-WDS 5.06

Individuals with disabilities are offered professional skill-development training courses in integrated settings, either directly or by referral, as appropriate to their individualized employment objectives.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 6: Job Development and Placement Services

The organization provides the necessary job development and placement services to help the job seeker find and keep a job that is consistent with his or her employment plan.
NA The organization does not provide job development and placement services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Placement and follow-up procedures
  • Procedures for referring individuals to services
  • Sample labour market information provided to job seekers
  • Training curricula or other informational materials on job search strategies
  • Community resource and referral list including support service providers

  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Job seekers
    4. Employers
  • Review case records

 

CA-WDS 6.01

The organization provides the job seeker with current labour market information, consistent with their employment objectives, including current job listings with salary levels and opportunities for advancement.

 

CA-WDS 6.02

The organization supports the job seeker’s search for employment by helping him or her develop a job search strategy and improve job search skills including:
  1. resume writing;
  2. interview and negotiation techniques; and
  3. accessing online resources.

 

CA-WDS 6.03

To promote job retention, the organization:
  1. offers varied placement opportunities;
  2. encourages job seekers to pursue living wage jobs;
  3. links job seekers to appropriate work supports; 
  4. provides job placements with potential for advancement; and
  5. provides job seekers, either directly or by referral, with needed support services designed to reduce barriers to job retention.
Examples: Work supports are federally and provincially funded programs that provide assistance to low-income families. Examples of work supports include public assistance and subsidized medical, education, and housing.

Examples: Common barriers to job retention include:
  1. family responsibilities;
  2. inaccessible or unreliable transportation;
  3. insufficient benefits or income;
  4. social isolation on the job;
  5. lack of dependable childcare;
  6. the continued use of alcohol or drugs; and
  7. a lack of affordable and dependable housing.

 

CA-WDS 6.04

Following a placement, the organization:
  1. follows up with both the employer and the employee to assess the appropriateness of the placement and address any emerging issues with placed workers; and
  2. continues follow-up and support services as appropriate to the identified needs of the individual and the employer.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 7: Financial Literacy

The organization promotes the achievement of identified financial goals by providing the individual with the knowledge necessary to effectively manage his or her finances.
NA The organization does not provide financial literacy education.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
No Self-Study Evidence
  • Training curricula and/or other informational materials on financial literacy topics
  • Community resource and referral list including financial service providers
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Job seekers
  • Review case records

 

CA-WDS 7.01

The organization provides basic financial literacy information in plain language with technical terms, abbreviations, and acronyms clearly defined.

 

CA-WDS 7.02

Financial literacy topics are adjusted according to the identified needs of the group or individual receiving services and include information regarding:
  1. predatory lending;
  2. banking;
  3. the establishment and maintenance of good credit;
  4. debt management;
  5. paying bills;
  6. investing in the future;
  7. insurance;
  8. tax basics;
  9. budgeting; and
  10. buying a home.

 

CA-WDS 7.03

Direct service personnel provide individuals with contact information for specific resources in the community including places to receive financial advice and debt counselling services.
 
2022 Edition

Workforce Development and Support Services (CA-WDS) 8: Financial Asset Building Services

The organization encourages asset accumulation by working with the individual to save, build assets, manage resources, and plan for crisis.
NA The organization does not provide financial asset building services.
1
All elements or requirements outlined in the standard are evident in practice, as indicated by full implementation of the practices outlined in the Practice Standards.
2
Practices are basically sound but there is room for improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • Minor inconsistencies and not yet fully developed practices are noted; however, these do not significantly impact service quality; or
  • Procedures need strengthening; or
  • With few exceptions, procedures are understood by staff and are being used; or
  • For the most part, established timeframes are met; or
  • Proper documentation is the norm and any issues with individual staff members are being addressed through performance evaluations and training; or
  • Active client participation occurs to a considerable extent.
3
Practice requires significant improvement, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards. Service quality or program functioning may be compromised; e.g.,
  • Procedures and/or case record documentation need significant strengthening; or
  • Procedures are not well-understood or used appropriately; or
  • Timeframes are often missed; or
  • Several client records are missing important information; or
  • Client participation is inconsistent. 
4
Implementation of the standard is minimal or there is no evidence of implementation at all, as noted in the ratings for the Practice Standards; e.g.,
  • No written procedures, or procedures are clearly inadequate or not being used; or 
  • Documentation is routinely incomplete and/or missing.      
Self-Study EvidenceOn-Site EvidenceOn-Site Activities
  • Procedures for referring individuals to services
  • Financial resource management planning procedures
  • Crisis planning procedures
  • Community resource and referral list including support services
  • Interviews may include:
    1. Program director
    2. Relevant personnel
    3. Job seekers
  • Review case records

 

CA-WDS 8.01

The organization helps the individual to identify and overcome barriers to asset building by accessing support services provided directly or by referral.
Examples: Barriers to asset building can include:
  1. insufficient income;
  2. inadequate training or education;
  3. lack of affordable and safe housing;
  4. family responsibilities;
  5. lack of affordable and quality child care; and
  6. transportation needs.

 

CA-WDS 8.02

The organization works with the individual to develop a plan for financial resource management including:
  1. goal setting;
  2. long- and short-term financial planning;
  3. record keeping; and
  4. controlled spending.

 

CA-WDS 8.03

The organization works with the individual to establish a crisis plan in case of unexpected financial hardship.
Example: Financial hardship may be brought on by life events such as unexpected job loss, natural disaster, or illness.
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